Use Internet to network to VB5 app?

I currently have a VB5 application installed on one customer PC(used as a 
server) in an office and use the customer's network to connect all other PC's 
in the office(client PCs) to my application.

Is it possible, and if possible, how could I use the Internet for client 
computers in this office to connect(network) to my VB5 application on the 
customer's computer which acts as a server for my application. This is a low 
volume environment so I don't need a true "Server computer" (hardware wise). 
This is desirable because my customer would also like to use my application 
from home.

When you click the Icon for my application's exe on the Windows destop 
screen, I display a screen for the customer to enter a password, and then, 
based on the password entered, direct him to other screens.
0
Utf
6/18/2010 7:41:29 PM
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"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:03991D85-0873-4C68-B9CE-5085E730A5E9@microsoft.com...
>
> I currently have a VB5 application installed on one customer PC(used as a
> server) in an office and use the customer's network to connect all other PC's
> in the office(client PCs) to my application.
>
> Is it possible, and if possible, how could I use the Internet for client
> computers in this office to connect(network) to my VB5 application on the
> customer's computer which acts as a server for my application. This is a low
> volume environment so I don't need a true "Server computer" (hardware wise).
> This is desirable because my customer would also like to use my application
> from home.
>
> When you click the Icon for my application's exe on the Windows destop
> screen, I display a screen for the customer to enter a password, and then,
> based on the password entered, direct him to other screens.



Dennis,
I've now read your post four times but I still don't quite understand
what you/your client/your app are doing.
Your app sits physically on one computer - acting  as file server - right?
But you still need some files on the local PCs: runtime files, OCXs, isn't it?

There is the problem of the restriction to maximal 10 inbound sessions
including the local session on the "server" if it has no server OS.
This has nothing to do with hardware, it's a limitation of the Windows
operating systems. The "Home" editions are limited to 5 sessions.

This session limit is an NT and higher thing, there was never a session
limit with Win95. (Don't know for 98 and Me, but I guess no limit either).

For connecting computers via the internet: you could setup a VPN.

Helmut.

BTW, with some clients I use a similiar approach: My app gets initially
installed on the local PCs, then the installing person changes the destination
in the link to the exe on a network share. When I have to install a update,
the old exe on the network share gets renamed while the app is still running
on the user PCs. The new exe gets copied to the network share. Done.
The next time the user starts the app he has the new version.

0
Helmut
6/18/2010 9:34:51 PM

"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
news:03991D85-0873-4C68-B9CE-5085E730A5E9@microsoft.com...
> I currently have a VB5 application installed on one customer PC(used as a
> server) in an office and use the customer's network to connect all other 
> PC's
> in the office(client PCs) to my application.
>
> Is it possible, and if possible, how could I use the Internet for client
> computers in this office to connect(network) to my VB5 application on the
> customer's computer which acts as a server for my application. This is a 
> low
> volume environment so I don't need a true "Server computer" (hardware 
> wise).
> This is desirable because my customer would also like to use my 
> application
> from home.
>

Why can't your client just install your app on his home computer?  Assuming 
the client has a VPN or other network connection to the "office" (which is a 
reasonable assumption if he's able to work from home and presumably needs 
access to the office network to be able to do that), there shouldn't be a 
problem. That's not to say there isn't some configuration involved and 
perhaps you'll need to change some things in your app (which should be able 
to be changed via options in your program), but it should be doable.

But I'm with Helmut in that I'm a little confused about this scenario too. 
It's a little non-conventional (at least *I've* never heard of doing what 
you're doing before). I mean, it's one thing to install an app on a Terminal 
Server and all users run it from there. Shoot, even installing it to a 
shared network folder and users run it from there (usually involves some 
files be locally installed or at least locally registered too though). From 
what I can gather, your app is installed locally on a desktop PC and other 
users run your app from that installation?  Is that right? 
That's...unconventional. I'm not even sure how you could do that except for 
the other users RDPing to the desktop PC that has it installed.

-- 
Mike
 

0
MikeD
6/19/2010 3:07:16 AM

"MikeD" wrote:

> 
> 
> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
> news:03991D85-0873-4C68-B9CE-5085E730A5E9@microsoft.com...
> > I currently have a VB5 application installed on one customer PC(used as a
> > server) in an office and use the customer's network to connect all other 
> > PC's
> > in the office(client PCs) to my application.
> >
> > Is it possible, and if possible, how could I use the Internet for client
> > computers in this office to connect(network) to my VB5 application on the
> > customer's computer which acts as a server for my application. This is a 
> > low
> > volume environment so I don't need a true "Server computer" (hardware 
> > wise).
> > This is desirable because my customer would also like to use my 
> > application
> > from home.
> >
> 
> Why can't your client just install your app on his home computer?  Assuming 
> the client has a VPN or other network connection to the "office" (which is a 
> reasonable assumption if he's able to work from home and presumably needs 
> access to the office network to be able to do that), there shouldn't be a 
> problem. That's not to say there isn't some configuration involved and 
> perhaps you'll need to change some things in your app (which should be able 
> to be changed via options in your program), but it should be doable.
> 
> But I'm with Helmut in that I'm a little confused about this scenario too. 
> It's a little non-conventional (at least *I've* never heard of doing what 
> you're doing before). I mean, it's one thing to install an app on a Terminal 
> Server and all users run it from there. Shoot, even installing it to a 
> shared network folder and users run it from there (usually involves some 
> files be locally installed or at least locally registered too though). From 
> what I can gather, your app is installed locally on a desktop PC and other 
> users run your app from that installation?  Is that right? 
> That's...unconventional. I'm not even sure how you could do that except for 
> the other users RDPing to the desktop PC that has it installed.
> 
> -- 
> Mike
>  
> 
> .
> 

Thanks Mike and Helmut for your response,

I obviously didn't explain my setup correctly.  I install all of my runtime 
files and database files in various shared folders on 1 PC in my customer's 
office(which I call the Server Computer).  I then go to each of the other 
computers in the customer's office(which I call client computers), browse the 
network for the "computer with my runtime files and databases", select my 
shared folder with my exe file, rightclick my exe file and click "send to, 
desktop create shortcut".  The customer then clicks this Icon to run my app 
from the server computer.

They don't have a VPN just a LAN since they usually only have 1 location.

If there is a better way, I'm open for suggestions.
0
Utf
6/19/2010 3:32:39 PM

"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
news:6ACBF1F7-AB5F-4B2B-B05B-AFAA40BF4262@microsoft.com...

> Thanks Mike and Helmut for your response,
>
> I obviously didn't explain my setup correctly.  I install all of my 
> runtime
> files and database files in various shared folders on 1 PC in my 
> customer's
> office(which I call the Server Computer).  I then go to each of the other
> computers in the customer's office(which I call client computers), browse 
> the
> network for the "computer with my runtime files and databases", select my
> shared folder with my exe file, rightclick my exe file and click "send to,
> desktop create shortcut".  The customer then clicks this Icon to run my 
> app
> from the server computer.
>
> They don't have a VPN just a LAN since they usually only have 1 location.
>
> If there is a better way, I'm open for suggestions.

Egad.  That just doesn't seem "right" to me.  <g>  Since you need to go 
around to each "client" PC anyway, why not just install the app locally on 
each of them? If the database files need to be shared, then place those on a 
network folder each client computer can access (or better yet, use a 
"server-type" RDBMS; even the free SQL Server Express would do and there are 
other free ones as well).

As far as the problem you originally asked about, a VPN or using remote 
desktop to the office PC (remote desktop, if you're not familiar with it, 
only requires an internet connection but you do need to open firewall ports) 
are the only things I can think of to allow users to work from home.

-- 
Mike
 

0
MikeD
6/20/2010 1:41:40 AM

"MikeD" wrote:

> 
> 
> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
> news:6ACBF1F7-AB5F-4B2B-B05B-AFAA40BF4262@microsoft.com...
> 
> > Thanks Mike and Helmut for your response,
> >
> > I obviously didn't explain my setup correctly.  I install all of my 
> > runtime
> > files and database files in various shared folders on 1 PC in my 
> > customer's
> > office(which I call the Server Computer).  I then go to each of the other
> > computers in the customer's office(which I call client computers), browse 
> > the
> > network for the "computer with my runtime files and databases", select my
> > shared folder with my exe file, rightclick my exe file and click "send to,
> > desktop create shortcut".  The customer then clicks this Icon to run my 
> > app
> > from the server computer.
> >
> > They don't have a VPN just a LAN since they usually only have 1 location.
> >
> > If there is a better way, I'm open for suggestions.
> 
> Egad.  That just doesn't seem "right" to me.  <g>  Since you need to go 
> around to each "client" PC anyway, why not just install the app locally on 
> each of them? If the database files need to be shared, then place those on a 
> network folder each client computer can access (or better yet, use a 
> "server-type" RDBMS; even the free SQL Server Express would do and there are 
> other free ones as well).
> 
> As far as the problem you originally asked about, a VPN or using remote 
> desktop to the office PC (remote desktop, if you're not familiar with it, 
> only requires an internet connection but you do need to open firewall ports) 
> are the only things I can think of to allow users to work from home.
> 
> -- 
> Mike
>  
> 
> .
> 

Dear Mike,

You are just a wealth of knowledge!

I have tested "remote desktop" and it works just fine.  The only problem 
being that if someone in the office logged on while a remote session was in 
process, the connection is broken.

On setting up a VPN, I read the instructions at   
"http://faq.programmerworld.net/networking/setting-up-a-vpn-in-windows-two-step-process" 
   and that seems easy enough.  Is that all there is to setting up a VPN?  No 
special equipment needed?  Any security concerns?

About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app 
program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several times 
a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client PCs.  
What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something? 

I really appreciate your help on these issues!!!!! 



0
Utf
6/23/2010 6:12:10 PM
"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
>
> About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several times
> a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client PCs.
> What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
>


Seems so.
The "server" PC, which operating system is it running?
How many "client PCs"?

If it's just a Workstation, Professional, or Ultimate Edition running on the
"server", then you may be in trouble.
As I said in my first post, there is a limit on "inbound" connections built
into those systems.

If a user is logged-on locally on the "server", then this counts as the first
session. The limit is 10 concurrent sessions. If  9 other PCs try to run
your program concurrently, the session limit is met.
Any access to a shared directory or a shared printer from a different PC
is counted as a session. You can even have two sessions from one PC, if
say the user "John" on PC017 is connected to the "server" and then without
logging-off switches to logon as user "Admin". If he now connect to the
"server" a second session from PC017 is established.

Helmut.

0
Helmut
6/23/2010 8:15:03 PM

"Helmut Meukel" wrote:

> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
> news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
> >
> > About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> > program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several times
> > a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client PCs.
> > What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
> >
> 
> 
> Seems so.
> The "server" PC, which operating system is it running?
> How many "client PCs"?
> 
> If it's just a Workstation, Professional, or Ultimate Edition running on the
> "server", then you may be in trouble.
> As I said in my first post, there is a limit on "inbound" connections built
> into those systems.
> 
> If a user is logged-on locally on the "server", then this counts as the first
> session. The limit is 10 concurrent sessions. If  9 other PCs try to run
> your program concurrently, the session limit is met.
> Any access to a shared directory or a shared printer from a different PC
> is counted as a session. You can even have two sessions from one PC, if
> say the user "John" on PC017 is connected to the "server" and then without
> logging-off switches to logon as user "Admin". If he now connect to the
> "server" a second session from PC017 is established.
> 
> Helmut.
> 
> .
> Helmut,

Thanks for the reply.  Most Server PCs at my customer locations run Windows 
XP Professional and there may be 3 to 10 Client PCs connected to my system on 
the Server PC shared folders.
0
Utf
6/23/2010 10:22:45 PM

"Helmut Meukel" wrote:

> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
> news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
> >
> > About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> > program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several times
> > a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client PCs.
> > What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
> >
> 
> 
> Seems so.
> The "server" PC, which operating system is it running?
> How many "client PCs"?
> 
> If it's just a Workstation, Professional, or Ultimate Edition running on the
> "server", then you may be in trouble.
> As I said in my first post, there is a limit on "inbound" connections built
> into those systems.
> 
> If a user is logged-on locally on the "server", then this counts as the first
> session. The limit is 10 concurrent sessions. If  9 other PCs try to run
> your program concurrently, the session limit is met.
> Any access to a shared directory or a shared printer from a different PC
> is counted as a session. You can even have two sessions from one PC, if
> say the user "John" on PC017 is connected to the "server" and then without
> logging-off switches to logon as user "Admin". If he now connect to the
> "server" a second session from PC017 is established.
> 
> Helmut.
> 
> .
> Does the session limit apply to my app only and not to my Database located in a shared folder on the same ServerPC?
0
Utf
6/24/2010 12:01:37 AM
"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:85B14D8D-E9CE-4DAB-8D71-8C614789A644@microsoft.com...
>
>
> "Helmut Meukel" wrote:
>
>> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
>> news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
>> >
>> > About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
>> > program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several 
>> > times
>> > a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client 
>> > PCs.
>> > What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
>> >
>>
>>
>> Seems so.
>> The "server" PC, which operating system is it running?
>> How many "client PCs"?
>>
>> If it's just a Workstation, Professional, or Ultimate Edition running on the
>> "server", then you may be in trouble.
>> As I said in my first post, there is a limit on "inbound" connections built
>> into those systems.
>>
>> If a user is logged-on locally on the "server", then this counts as the first
>> session. The limit is 10 concurrent sessions. If  9 other PCs try to run
>> your program concurrently, the session limit is met.
>> Any access to a shared directory or a shared printer from a different PC
>> is counted as a session. You can even have two sessions from one PC, if
>> say the user "John" on PC017 is connected to the "server" and then without
>> logging-off switches to logon as user "Admin". If he now connect to the
>> "server" a second session from PC017 is established.
>>
>> Helmut.
>>
> .
> Does the session limit apply to my app only and not to my Database
> located in a shared folder on the same ServerPC?

Aany connection using normal Windows network services as base
counts to the session limit.
However multiple connections from the same ClientPC/User are  only
one session. This connection/session limit applies only for inbound
connections. That is "PC008" can connect to hundreds of other PCs
on the LAN using their shared resources.
The "inbound" limit does not apply for FTP connections etc.

If you come close to the 10 session limit, there is one pitfall:
"concurrent" is the term used by M$. This means if I create network
drive "X:" which connects to \\PC002\Customers\ then this counts
as a session on PC002.  But about 15 minutes later without any
traffic the "logical" connection is dropped., counting no longer as
session. When I about an hour later try to read some data from
drive X:, the logical connection is automatically reestablished,
causing a Network error if at this time there are already 10 active
sessions on PC002.
With running an app from a network share, in my experience the
logical connection is never dropped.
I overcame this problem by using 2 "server"PCs  <g>.

The other - the M$ - solution for this problem is to install a server
version of Windows on the "server"PC, but then you have to pay
for the server version plus enough client licences and M$ will be
happy.

Helmut.

0
Helmut
6/24/2010 8:23:13 AM

"Helmut Meukel" wrote:

> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
> news:85B14D8D-E9CE-4DAB-8D71-8C614789A644@microsoft.com...
> >
> >
> > "Helmut Meukel" wrote:
> >
> >> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> >> news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
> >> >
> >> > About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> >> > program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several 
> >> > times
> >> > a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client 
> >> > PCs.
> >> > What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> Seems so.
> >> The "server" PC, which operating system is it running?
> >> How many "client PCs"?
> >>
> >> If it's just a Workstation, Professional, or Ultimate Edition running on the
> >> "server", then you may be in trouble.
> >> As I said in my first post, there is a limit on "inbound" connections built
> >> into those systems.
> >>
> >> If a user is logged-on locally on the "server", then this counts as the first
> >> session. The limit is 10 concurrent sessions. If  9 other PCs try to run
> >> your program concurrently, the session limit is met.
> >> Any access to a shared directory or a shared printer from a different PC
> >> is counted as a session. You can even have two sessions from one PC, if
> >> say the user "John" on PC017 is connected to the "server" and then without
> >> logging-off switches to logon as user "Admin". If he now connect to the
> >> "server" a second session from PC017 is established.
> >>
> >> Helmut.
> >>
> > .
> > Does the session limit apply to my app only and not to my Database
> > located in a shared folder on the same ServerPC?
> 
> Aany connection using normal Windows network services as base
> counts to the session limit.
> However multiple connections from the same ClientPC/User are  only
> one session. This connection/session limit applies only for inbound
> connections. That is "PC008" can connect to hundreds of other PCs
> on the LAN using their shared resources.
> The "inbound" limit does not apply for FTP connections etc.
> 
> If you come close to the 10 session limit, there is one pitfall:
> "concurrent" is the term used by M$. This means if I create network
> drive "X:" which connects to \\PC002\Customers\ then this counts
> as a session on PC002.  But about 15 minutes later without any
> traffic the "logical" connection is dropped., counting no longer as
> session. When I about an hour later try to read some data from
> drive X:, the logical connection is automatically reestablished,
> causing a Network error if at this time there are already 10 active
> sessions on PC002.
> With running an app from a network share, in my experience the
> logical connection is never dropped.
> I overcame this problem by using 2 "server"PCs  <g>.
> 
> The other - the M$ - solution for this problem is to install a server
> version of Windows on the "server"PC, but then you have to pay
> for the server version plus enough client licences and M$ will be
> happy.
> 
> Helmut.
> 
> .
> Helmut,

Thanks again for all the good scoop!!

Now back to my other question about VPNs and 
Remote Desktop.

I have tested "remote desktop" and it works just fine. Is any encription 
used with Remote Desktop?

On setting up a VPN, I read the instructions at 
"http://faq.programmerworld.net/networking/setting-up-a-vpn-in-windows-two-step-process" 
and that seems easy enough. Is that all there is to setting up a VPN? No 
special equipment needed? Any security concerns? Is any encription used with 
VPNs? 

Thanks again for your help!!

0
Utf
6/24/2010 2:47:05 PM
Dennis Rose wrote:
>
> I have tested "remote desktop" and it works just fine. Is any encription
> used with Remote Desktop?
>
> On setting up a VPN, I read the instructions at
> "http://faq.programmerworld.net/networking/setting-up-a-vpn-in-windows-two-step-process"
> and that seems easy enough. Is that all there is to setting up a VPN? No
> special equipment needed? Any security concerns? Is any encription used with
> VPNs?
>

RDP (remote desktop protocol) uses encryption and so does a VPN.

You don't have to use RDP with a VPN, but it's advisable - to prevent 
anyone (or anything) from trying to login to your server via RDP.

If the modem/router/firewall at your work doesn't have a permanent IP 
address then you should use a dynamic DNS service, such as dyndns.org, 
to help create your VPN.
0
Jason
6/24/2010 3:48:43 PM

"Helmut Meukel" wrote:

> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
> news:85B14D8D-E9CE-4DAB-8D71-8C614789A644@microsoft.com...
> >
> >
> > "Helmut Meukel" wrote:
> >
> >> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> >> news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
> >> >
> >> > About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> >> > program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several 
> >> > times
> >> > a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client 
> >> > PCs.
> >> > What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >> Seems so.
> >> The "server" PC, which operating system is it running?
> >> How many "client PCs"?
> >>
> >> If it's just a Workstation, Professional, or Ultimate Edition running on the
> >> "server", then you may be in trouble.
> >> As I said in my first post, there is a limit on "inbound" connections built
> >> into those systems.
> >>
> >> If a user is logged-on locally on the "server", then this counts as the first
> >> session. The limit is 10 concurrent sessions. If  9 other PCs try to run
> >> your program concurrently, the session limit is met.
> >> Any access to a shared directory or a shared printer from a different PC
> >> is counted as a session. You can even have two sessions from one PC, if
> >> say the user "John" on PC017 is connected to the "server" and then without
> >> logging-off switches to logon as user "Admin". If he now connect to the
> >> "server" a second session from PC017 is established.
> >>
> >> Helmut.
> >>
> > .
> > Does the session limit apply to my app only and not to my Database
> > located in a shared folder on the same ServerPC?
> 
> Aany connection using normal Windows network services as base
> counts to the session limit.
> However multiple connections from the same ClientPC/User are  only
> one session. This connection/session limit applies only for inbound
> connections. That is "PC008" can connect to hundreds of other PCs
> on the LAN using their shared resources.
> The "inbound" limit does not apply for FTP connections etc.
> 
> If you come close to the 10 session limit, there is one pitfall:
> "concurrent" is the term used by M$. This means if I create network
> drive "X:" which connects to \\PC002\Customers\ then this counts
> as a session on PC002.  But about 15 minutes later without any
> traffic the "logical" connection is dropped., counting no longer as
> session. When I about an hour later try to read some data from
> drive X:, the logical connection is automatically reestablished,
> causing a Network error if at this time there are already 10 active
> sessions on PC002.
> With running an app from a network share, in my experience the
> logical connection is never dropped.
> I overcame this problem by using 2 "server"PCs  <g>.
> 
> The other - the M$ - solution for this problem is to install a server
> version of Windows on the "server"PC, but then you have to pay
> for the server version plus enough client licences and M$ will be
> happy.
> 
> Helmut.
> 
> .
> Afterthought.  I guess what I am asking is, is there a difference in a VPN and a "Secure VPN" or am I being overly cautious? same question applies to "Remote Desktop"!!
0
Utf
6/24/2010 3:55:08 PM

"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
>
>
> I have tested "remote desktop" and it works just fine.  The only problem
> being that if someone in the office logged on while a remote session was 
> in
> process, the connection is broken.

Create multiple Windows accounts and have each user use a different one. 
But as has been mentioned, there is a limit on the number of remote 
connections you can make.
>
> On setting up a VPN, I read the instructions at
> "http://faq.programmerworld.net/networking/setting-up-a-vpn-in-windows-two-step-process"
>   and that seems easy enough.  Is that all there is to setting up a VPN? 
> No
> special equipment needed?  Any security concerns?

Well, there can be security concerns with ANY kind of network connection. I 
don't think any can be considered 100% invulnerable. I'm hardly an expert on 
VPN or networking in general. Your best place to ask about VPNs or 
networking would be in forums specifically for those topics.

>
> About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several 
> times
> a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client 
> PCs.
> What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
>
> I really appreciate your help on these issues!!!!!


You might be calling it a "server", but it's not.  You mention elsewhere 
these are Windows XP systems. Those are NOT servers.  You can call them 
whatever you want, but they're workstations.  All you're really doing is 
sharing a folder.

If you've been doing things this way for quite some time and have not had 
any problems, then I guess go ahead and continue as you've been. As I said 
before, it's just unconventional. I would think the biggest drawback would 
be performance. Chances are, this PC probably doesn’t have the power to 
really be doing something like this without everything else on that PC being 
affected to some degree, if not severely then at least noticeably. Perhaps 
there's never more than a couple of people running your app simultaneously.

True servers are powerful workhorses that are designed to provide services 
to multiple workstations and multiple users, and are going to be running 
Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2008 (and I'm sure some servers are 
still running Windows 2000 Server or even a non-Windows platform).

I understand the convenience of only having to update your app once, instead 
of going around to each workstation and updating it.  But there are most 
definitely better ways to deal with that than what you're doing. You could 
use some kind of push technology that automatically pushes updates to 
workstations when users log in. Or you could write auto-update functionality 
into your app. There are many ways to do this.  What I find works well is to 
have a "stub" program that checks a network folder to see if an updated 
version is available.  If so, it copies the updates file(s) from the network 
folder to the local installation folder. Then it launches the main app and 
the stub program closes.  If no update is available, then it just launches 
the main program and closes. In a nutshell, that's really all there is to 
it. An issue with this, especially with Vista and Win7, is that users 
probably won't have the necessary permissions to update the program even if 
they're an admin. So the stub program needs to run with elevated 
permissions.

-- 
Mike

 

0
MikeD
6/24/2010 9:44:18 PM
"Helmut Meukel" <Helmut_Meukel@NoProvider.de> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:hvv4lk$e8l$1@news.eternal-september.org...
> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
> news:85B14D8D-E9CE-4DAB-8D71-8C614789A644@microsoft.com...
>>
>> Does the session limit apply to my app only and not to my Database
>> located in a shared folder on the same ServerPC?
>
> Any connection using normal Windows network services as base
> counts to the session limit.
> However multiple connections from the same ClientPC/User are  only
> one session. This connection/session limit applies only for inbound
> connections. That is "PC008" can connect to hundreds of other PCs
> on the LAN using their shared resources.
> The "inbound" limit does not apply for FTP connections etc.
>
> If you come close to the 10 session limit, there is one pitfall:
> "concurrent" is the term used by M$. This means if I create network
> drive "X:" which connects to \\PC002\Customers\ then this counts
> as a session on PC002.  But about 15 minutes later without any
> traffic the "logical" connection is dropped., counting no longer as
> session. When I about an hour later try to read some data from
> drive X:, the logical connection is automatically reestablished,
> causing a Network error if at this time there are already 10 active
> sessions on PC002.
> With running an app from a network share, in my experience the
> logical connection is never dropped.
> I overcame this problem by using 2 "server"PCs  <g>.
>
> The other - the M$ - solution for this problem is to install a server
> version of Windows on the "server"PC, but then you have to pay
> for the server version plus enough client licences and M$ will be
> happy.
>
> Helmut.
>


Another solution would be to use a NDAS - Network Direct
Attached Storage.
You have to install drivers on each PC using it, but then Windows
will treat it as a local disk!
I'm using one in my own Gigabit LAN since January and it works
flawlessly. The prices here in Germany are 66 euro for the empty
box + 110 euro for the 2TB 3.5" Drive.
http://www.ximeta.com

Helmut.

0
Helmut
6/25/2010 9:45:46 AM

"MikeD" wrote:

> 
> 
> "Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
> news:C65C1120-631C-4356-9085-66CCEA475F9C@microsoft.com...
> >
> >
> > I have tested "remote desktop" and it works just fine.  The only problem
> > being that if someone in the office logged on while a remote session was 
> > in
> > process, the connection is broken.
> 
> Create multiple Windows accounts and have each user use a different one. 
> But as has been mentioned, there is a limit on the number of remote 
> connections you can make.
> >
> > On setting up a VPN, I read the instructions at
> > "http://faq.programmerworld.net/networking/setting-up-a-vpn-in-windows-two-step-process"
> >   and that seems easy enough.  Is that all there is to setting up a VPN? 
> > No
> > special equipment needed?  Any security concerns?
> 
> Well, there can be security concerns with ANY kind of network connection. I 
> don't think any can be considered 100% invulnerable. I'm hardly an expert on 
> VPN or networking in general. Your best place to ask about VPNs or 
> networking would be in forums specifically for those topics.
> 
> >
> > About my regular app setup at the customer location.  I network to my app
> > program located on the "server" PC because I update my software several 
> > times
> > a year and would rather update it on 1 server PC instead of many client 
> > PCs.
> > What's wrong with this setup anyway?  Am I missing something?
> >
> > I really appreciate your help on these issues!!!!!
> 
> 
> You might be calling it a "server", but it's not.  You mention elsewhere 
> these are Windows XP systems. Those are NOT servers.  You can call them 
> whatever you want, but they're workstations.  All you're really doing is 
> sharing a folder.
> 
> If you've been doing things this way for quite some time and have not had 
> any problems, then I guess go ahead and continue as you've been. As I said 
> before, it's just unconventional. I would think the biggest drawback would 
> be performance. Chances are, this PC probably doesn’t have the power to 
> really be doing something like this without everything else on that PC being 
> affected to some degree, if not severely then at least noticeably. Perhaps 
> there's never more than a couple of people running your app simultaneously.
> 
> True servers are powerful workhorses that are designed to provide services 
> to multiple workstations and multiple users, and are going to be running 
> Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2008 (and I'm sure some servers are 
> still running Windows 2000 Server or even a non-Windows platform).
> 
> I understand the convenience of only having to update your app once, instead 
> of going around to each workstation and updating it.  But there are most 
> definitely better ways to deal with that than what you're doing. You could 
> use some kind of push technology that automatically pushes updates to 
> workstations when users log in. Or you could write auto-update functionality 
> into your app. There are many ways to do this.  What I find works well is to 
> have a "stub" program that checks a network folder to see if an updated 
> version is available.  If so, it copies the updates file(s) from the network 
> folder to the local installation folder. Then it launches the main app and 
> the stub program closes.  If no update is available, then it just launches 
> the main program and closes. In a nutshell, that's really all there is to 
> it. An issue with this, especially with Vista and Win7, is that users 
> probably won't have the necessary permissions to update the program even if 
> they're an admin. So the stub program needs to run with elevated 
> permissions.
> 
> -- 
> Mike
> 
>  
> 
> .
> Dear Mike,

Back to the Remote Desktop solution your suggested.

I can get Remote Desktop to work fine in my office on my network, but, when 
I try to log on from another network at a remote location I get the message: 
"Remote Desktop Disconnected.  This computer can't connect to the remote 
computer".

I get this message using both Vista and XP remote computers.  I have 
researched Google but I still can't get it to work from another network at a 
remote location.

What could be wrong???
0
Utf
6/29/2010 8:26:35 PM

"Dennis Rose" <DennisRose@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
news:4F1659F9-4CA5-4FFE-AACB-C620567FD750@microsoft.com...
> Back to the Remote Desktop solution your suggested.
>
> I can get Remote Desktop to work fine in my office on my network, but, 
> when
> I try to log on from another network at a remote location I get the 
> message:
> "Remote Desktop Disconnected.  This computer can't connect to the remote
> computer".
>
> I get this message using both Vista and XP remote computers.  I have
> researched Google but I still can't get it to work from another network at 
> a
> remote location.
>
> What could be wrong???

You're asking the wrong person and in the wrong newsgroup. This particular 
problem has nothing to do with VB or even programming for that matter.  Not 
trying to be rude.  You just stand a much better change of getting help with 
this by asking for help in the right place. The ONLY guess I have is that a 
firewall may be blocking the connection when outside the network.  Many 
firewalls are configured in this manner.  You need to ask a network person 
about this.

-- 
Mike

 

0
MikeD
6/30/2010 12:25:23 AM
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