XP to Windows 7

I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running XP/Sp3/IE8 
with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the same 
software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two 
internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift of 
a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My 
questions:

If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything 
else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still 
have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other HDs. 
But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the 
installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will 
prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get W7 
up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of my 
2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and two 
XP systems.

Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I don't 
want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to W7 
eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP capability 
on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a back 
up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with W7.

Any problem with doing this? 


0
bobster
2/4/2010 2:10:33 AM
windowsxp.general 3897 articles. 1 followers. Follow

20 Replies
912 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 2

lets see if I got this right...
on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 and 
#2???

If you disconnect the external drive and boot from the W7 disk during the 
process pick
one of the internal HD to install to..W7 will create the dual boot and change 
the MBR on the
other drive to reflect this dual boot. Be aware that the MBR will be on the XP 
HD and as such
if you remove this drive your system will not boot without a W7 repair.
Look at 
www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html


The other way is if your mobo BIOS supports the F12 boot menu option.
By disconnecting all drives except the drive where you will install W7 onto
there is no MBR change on the XP drive and you just do a normal installation.
Then when W7 is up and running you reconnect the XP drive. During the boot
process you should see a quick message to push F12 and a small window pops up
where you can pick the HD to boot from.

peter

-- 
If you find a posting or message from me offensive,inappropriate
or disruptive,please ignore it.
If you dont know how to ignore a posting complain
to me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate :-)

"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running XP/Sp3/IE8
> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the same
> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift of
> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
> questions:
>
> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other HDs.
> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get W7
> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of my
> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and two
> XP systems.
>
> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I don't
> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to W7
> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP capability
> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a back
> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with W7.
>
> Any problem with doing this?
>
> 
0
peter
2/4/2010 2:53:18 AM
Peter, you said,

"lets see if I got this right...
on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 and
#2???"

Yes, that is correct.  It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" on 
the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a computer 
failure.  With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure an 
always ready backup.

I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system.  What I really 
want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by the 
F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has.  Your suggestion of 
disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the #1 
internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me what 
I'm looking for.  And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 during 
the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.  You 
have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.

Thanks

=============================================================
"peter" <peter@nowhere.net> wrote in message 
news:%23gO5oUUpKHA.4860@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
lets see if I got this right...
on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 and
#2???

If you disconnect the external drive and boot from the W7 disk during the
process pick
one of the internal HD to install to..W7 will create the dual boot and 
change
the MBR on the
other drive to reflect this dual boot. Be aware that the MBR will be on the 
XP
HD and as such
if you remove this drive your system will not boot without a W7 repair.
Look at
www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html


The other way is if your mobo BIOS supports the F12 boot menu option.
By disconnecting all drives except the drive where you will install W7 onto
there is no MBR change on the XP drive and you just do a normal 
installation.
Then when W7 is up and running you reconnect the XP drive. During the boot
process you should see a quick message to push F12 and a small window pops 
up
where you can pick the HD to boot from.

peter

-- 
If you find a posting or message from me offensive,inappropriate
or disruptive,please ignore it.
If you dont know how to ignore a posting complain
to me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate :-)

"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running XP/Sp3/IE8
> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the 
> same
> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift 
> of
> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
> questions:
>
> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other 
> HDs.
> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get W7
> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of 
> my
> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and 
> two
> XP systems.
>
> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I 
> don't
> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to W7
> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP 
> capability
> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a 
> back
> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with 
> W7.
>
> Any problem with doing this?
>
> 


0
bobster
2/4/2010 3:33:02 AM
> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running 
>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
>> same
>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift
>> of
>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
>> questions:
>>
>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>> HDs.
>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get 
>> W7
>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
>> my
>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
>> two
>> XP systems.
>>
>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>> don't
>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to 
>> W7
>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>> capability
>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>> back
>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
>> W7.
>>
>> Any problem with doing this?


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> Peter, you said,
>
> "lets see if I got this right...
> on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
> you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
> Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1 
> and
> #2???"
>
> Yes, that is correct.  It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" on
> the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a 
> computer
> failure.  With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure 
> an
> always ready backup.
>
> I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system.  What I 
> really
> want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by 
> the
> F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has.  Your suggestion of
> disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the 
> #1
> internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me 
> what
> I'm looking for.  And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 during
> the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot. 
> You
> have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
>
> Thanks


bobster:
In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option 
you might want to consider...

If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper 
disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently released 
Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy 
capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD assuming, 
of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well. 
(I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that capability.)

So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent 
(should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that 
the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems? 
Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to 
contain the contents of both OSs.

One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal HDD 
would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority 
order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple matter 
to change the boot priority order as the need arises.

Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating 
systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS 
contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
Anna


0
Anna
2/4/2010 6:33:03 PM
Anna,

Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since my 
external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot 
capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for me 
as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been able to 
boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA 
port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530 
supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I also 
know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.

What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions , each 
with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support section 
sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.

Thanks again for your help.

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message 
news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...

> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
>> same
>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift
>> of
>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
>> questions:
>>
>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>> HDs.
>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that will
>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get
>> W7
>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
>> my
>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
>> two
>> XP systems.
>>
>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>> don't
>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
>> W7
>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>> capability
>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>> back
>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
>> W7.
>>
>> Any problem with doing this?


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> Peter, you said,
>
> "lets see if I got this right...
> on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and therefore
> you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
> Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
> and
> #2???"
>
> Yes, that is correct.  It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" on
> the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
> computer
> failure.  With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
> an
> always ready backup.
>
> I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system.  What I
> really
> want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
> the
> F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has.  Your suggestion of
> disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
> #1
> internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
> what
> I'm looking for.  And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 during
> the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
> You
> have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
>
> Thanks


bobster:
In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
you might want to consider...

If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently released
Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD assuming,
of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
(I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that capability.)

So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
(should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
contain the contents of both OSs.

One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal HDD
would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple matter
to change the boot priority order as the need arises.

Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
Anna



0
bobster
2/4/2010 10:52:52 PM
>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
>>> same
>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift
>>> of
>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
>>> questions:
>>>
>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>> HDs.
>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that 
>>> will
>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get
>>> W7
>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
>>> my
>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
>>> two
>>> XP systems.
>>>
>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>> don't
>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
>>> W7
>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>> capability
>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>> back
>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
>>> W7.
>>>
>>> Any problem with doing this?


> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>> Peter, you said,
>>
>> "lets see if I got this right...
>> on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and 
>> therefore
>> you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
>> Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
>> and
>> #2???"
>>
>> Yes, that is correct.  It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare" 
>> on
>> the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
>> computer
>> failure.  With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
>> an
>> always ready backup.
>>
>> I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system.  What I
>> really
>> want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
>> the
>> F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has.  Your suggestion of
>> disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
>> #1
>> internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
>> what
>> I'm looking for.  And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12 
>> during
>> the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
>> You
>> have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
>>
>> Thanks


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> bobster:
> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
> you might want to consider...
>
> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently 
> released
> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD 
> assuming,
> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that 
> capability.)
>
> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
> contain the contents of both OSs.
>
> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal 
> HDD
> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple 
> matter
> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>
> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since 
> my
> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for 
> me
> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been able 
> to
> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I also
> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>
> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions , 
> each
> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support section
> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>
> Thanks again for your help.


bobster:
Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity 
(presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation. 
Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it 
didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external device. 
I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in the 
desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your external 
device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device is 
certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably 
outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may 
dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).

It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management 
snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty 
doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your 
"destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the current 
partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally clone 
the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.

If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two 
cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk Management 
to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already shown 
as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on 
the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu. 
And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so 
that the system will boot to the external disk.
Anna


0
Anna
2/5/2010 2:33:07 PM
Anna wrote:
>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message

<snip>

> bobster:
> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external 
> device.
> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in 
> the
> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your 
> external
> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my 
memory.

I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a Vantec 
eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm using a second 
*internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and presumably 
faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a clean restore 
after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an external backup). 


0
Bill
2/5/2010 8:50:11 PM
> Anna wrote:
> <snip>
>
>> bobster:
>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal 
>> situation.
>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port 
>> it
>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external 
>> device.
>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in 
>> the
>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your 
>> external
>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.


"Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message 
news:%23XrZRTqpKHA.1556@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my 
> memory.
>
> I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a 
> Vantec eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm using 
> a second *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and 
> presumably faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a 
> clean restore after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an external 
> backup).


Bill:
Thanks for the correction. I recall working on one of those Dell Inspiron 
530s some time ago and I didn't recall that it was equipped with an eSATA 
port. So I just assumed the OP had either installed an eSATA adapter in one 
of the PCI slots or made a direct connection from his/her SATA external 
enclosure to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
Anna



0
Anna
2/5/2010 10:20:59 PM
Anna wrote:
>> Anna wrote:
>> <snip>
>>
>>> bobster:
>>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
>>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
>>> situation.
>>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
>>> it
>>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
>>> device.
>>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
>>> the
>>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
>>> external
>>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>
>
> "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:%23XrZRTqpKHA.1556@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my
>> memory.
>>
>> I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a
>> Vantec eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm 
>> using
>> a second *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and
>> presumably faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a
>> clean restore after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an 
>> external
>> backup).
>
>
> Bill:
> Thanks for the correction. I recall working on one of those Dell Inspiron
> 530s some time ago and I didn't recall that it was equipped with an eSATA
> port. So I just assumed the OP had either installed an eSATA adapter in 
> one
> of the PCI slots or made a direct connection from his/her SATA external
> enclosure to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
> Anna

Well, in retrospect, my memory might be off, and maybe I put in a bracket 
(with the connector) that came with the Vantec enclosure kit - now I'm not 
so sure.   Old age may be setting in.  :-)    Maybe bobster can clarify it. 
Since I'm only now using the second internal SATA drive as a backup, I can't 
recall for sure. 


0
Bill
2/5/2010 11:41:57 PM
Anna,

Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I 
bought the  full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a 
rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD.  The other end 
connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board.  I've never 
had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB 
capable Vantec external enclosure.

I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have been 
discussing.  As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal 
position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one.  They each have 
been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have 3 
partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my 
destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2 or 
more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the 
size of the  drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper will 
probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either internal 
drive to a partition on the external drive.  If that happens I would 
probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to 
re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.

I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive formatting, 
but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and 
re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for XP 
and Windows 7.  Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently 
configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to the 
Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320 g 
WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with XP/IE-8 
on it) to this HD.  This sounds  complicated but I can change a drive in the 
Vantec in about 5 minutes.

I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as there 
is no hurry to do anything.

Any additional comments will be appreciated.


"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message 
news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
>>> same
>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a gift
>>> of
>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
>>> questions:
>>>
>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and everything
>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will still
>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>> HDs.
>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
>>> will
>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get
>>> W7
>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one of
>>> my
>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system and
>>> two
>>> XP systems.
>>>
>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>> don't
>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
>>> W7
>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>> capability
>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>> back
>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
>>> W7.
>>>
>>> Any problem with doing this?


> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u2CHDrUpKHA.5328@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>> Peter, you said,
>>
>> "lets see if I got this right...
>> on your 2 internal HD you have an XP installation on each HD and
>> therefore
>> you are  dualbooting????and both are exactly the same?
>> Plus you have a "cloned" external drive which is an exact copy of HD #1
>> and
>> #2???"
>>
>> Yes, that is correct.  It sounds kinda crazy but I wanted a "hot spare"
>> on
>> the 2nd internal drive and an external spare in the event the of a
>> computer
>> failure.  With HD prices at <$50 a pop it's a fairly cheap way to ensure
>> an
>> always ready backup.
>>
>> I really have no need to have a true dual boot W7/XP system.  What I
>> really
>> want is 3 independent bootable systems on 3 different HDs, selectable by
>> the
>> F-12 boot menu option which my Dell computer has.  Your suggestion of
>> disconnecting the #2 internal and the external HDs and loading W7 on the
>> #1
>> internal HD, then re-connecting the XP HDs sounds like it would give me
>> what
>> I'm looking for.  And BTW, that's exactly what I do now -- use F-12
>> during
>> the boot sequence to select which of the 3 HDs to which I want to boot.
>> You
>> have given me the courage to give W7 a low risk try.
>>
>> Thanks


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> bobster:
> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
> you might want to consider...
>
> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the Casper
> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
> released
> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
> assuming,
> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
> capability.)
>
> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so that
> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 systems?
> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
> contain the contents of both OSs.
>
> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
> HDD
> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot priority
> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
> matter
> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>
> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
> my
> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for
> me
> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been able
> to
> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I also
> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>
> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
> each
> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support section
> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>
> Thanks again for your help.


bobster:
Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
(presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external device.
I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in the
desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your external
device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.

In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device is
certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).

It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
"destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the current
partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally clone
the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.

If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk Management
to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already shown
as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
that the system will boot to the external disk.
Anna



0
bobster
2/6/2010 12:03:49 AM

"Bill in Co." wrote:
> 
> Well, in retrospect, my memory might be off, and maybe I put in a bracket
> (with the connector) that came with the Vantec enclosure kit - now I'm not
> so sure.   Old age may be setting in.  :-)    Maybe bobster can clarify it.
> Since I'm only now using the second internal SATA drive as a backup, I can't
> recall for sure.

Perhaps it is time to join the Geriatric Society of United States where
you can meet fellow geriatric Pig-Bear.
0
20100205
2/6/2010 12:08:38 AM
Bill,

See my last post to Anna regarding  my "as delivered" Inspiron 530 
configuration.  The first WD 320g HD I bought was the full kit and contained 
the eSATA cable and rear adapter/connector.  The other identical HDs were 
bought as "bare drives" which go for as little as $40 and come with nothing 
but the drive.

And, BTW, thanks for your comments as well as those from Peter.

===========================================
"Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message 
news:O9SMQzrpKHA.1544@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
Anna wrote:
>> Anna wrote:
>> <snip>
>>
>>> bobster:
>>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
>>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
>>> situation.
>>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
>>> it
>>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
>>> device.
>>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
>>> the
>>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
>>> external
>>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>
>
> "Bill in Co." <not_really_here@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:%23XrZRTqpKHA.1556@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> I think it does have an eSATA port already, Anna, unless I'm losing my
>> memory.
>>
>> I also have a Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop, and have in the past used a
>> Vantec eSATA/USB2 external HD enclosure for backup, although now I'm
>> using
>> a second *internal* SATA drive for that purpose, since its simpler and
>> presumably faster (and I've been using it a fair amount just to get a
>> clean restore after various software tests - otherwise I'd use an
>> external
>> backup).
>
>
> Bill:
> Thanks for the correction. I recall working on one of those Dell Inspiron
> 530s some time ago and I didn't recall that it was equipped with an eSATA
> port. So I just assumed the OP had either installed an eSATA adapter in
> one
> of the PCI slots or made a direct connection from his/her SATA external
> enclosure to one of the motherboard's SATA connectors.
> Anna

Well, in retrospect, my memory might be off, and maybe I put in a bracket
(with the connector) that came with the Vantec enclosure kit - now I'm not
so sure.   Old age may be setting in.  :-)    Maybe bobster can clarify it.
Since I'm only now using the second internal SATA drive as a backup, I can't
recall for sure.



0
bobster
2/6/2010 12:20:17 AM
>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
>>>> same
>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a 
>>>> gift
>>>> of
>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
>>>> questions:
>>>>
>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and 
>>>> everything
>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will 
>>>> still
>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>>> HDs.
>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
>>>> will
>>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get
>>>> W7
>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one 
>>>> of
>>>> my
>>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system 
>>>> and
>>>> two
>>>> XP systems.
>>>>
>>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>>> don't
>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
>>>> W7
>>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>>> capability
>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>>> back
>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
>>>> W7.
>>>>
>>>> Any problem with doing this?


>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> bobster:
>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
>> you might want to consider...
>>
>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the 
>> Casper
>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
>> released
>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
>> assuming,
>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
>> capability.)
>>
>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so 
>> that
>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7 
>> systems?
>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
>> contain the contents of both OSs.
>>
>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
>> HDD
>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot 
>> priority
>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
>> matter
>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>>
>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
>> Anna
>
>
> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> Anna,
>>
>> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
>> my
>> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for
>> me
>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been able
>> to
>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
>> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I 
>> also
>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>>
>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
>> each
>> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support 
>> section
>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>>
>> Thanks again for your help.


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

> bobster:
> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external 
> device.
> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in 
> the
> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your 
> external
> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>
> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device 
> is
> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
>
> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the 
> current
> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally 
> clone
> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
>
> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk 
> Management
> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already 
> shown
> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
> that the system will boot to the external disk.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
> bought the  full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD.  The other end
> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board.  I've never
> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
> capable Vantec external enclosure.
>
> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have been
> discussing.  As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one.  They each 
> have
> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have 
> 3
> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2 
> or
> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
> size of the  drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper 
> will
> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either 
> internal
> drive to a partition on the external drive.  If that happens I would
> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
>
> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive formatting,
> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for XP
> and Windows 7.  Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to 
> the
> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320 
> g
> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with 
> XP/IE-8
> on it) to this HD.  This sounds  complicated but I can change a drive in 
> the
> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
>
> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as 
> there
> is no hurry to do anything.
>
> Any additional comments will be appreciated.


bobster:
It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in 
your situation based upon your objective of working with two different 
operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an 
external HDD is to...
1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper 
disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each 
of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would 
multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the 
cloned contents of each OS.

Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with 
contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You haven't 
indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those two 
systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you create 
would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that 
particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?

I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be single-partitioned. 
Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition 
these drives.

Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of *no* 
relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an 
example...

Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is 
installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS. Assuming 
the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the system 
will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter 
assignment.

Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a 
secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter 
assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this 
operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.

Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming 
the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2, the 
system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive 
letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is 
also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: 
drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive, 
i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what we 
are discussing.

And so on & so on...

Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you decide 
to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you 
previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you originally 
multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters 
assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our 
present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act as 
the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of 
your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of 
that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition 
having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.

You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS 
contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as the 
recipient of those cloned contents.

So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your XP 
& Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have 
been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your external 
HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs 
contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned XP 
OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to 
first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously 
explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that the 
BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD. 
The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and 
receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned 
Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G: 
drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the 
latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.

Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to 
boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the 
partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority 
order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.

Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your 
objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a 
sensible one under your circumstances.
Anna 


0
Anna
2/6/2010 4:02:24 AM
Anna,

Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me regarding 
the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode.  Since I haven't 
downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size.  The XP 
installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess that 
the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that.  I would think that 3 
80 gig partitions on the external drive  would be about right.  I will let 
you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.

================================================================
"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message 
news:OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...

>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to the
>>>> same
>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a
>>>> gift
>>>> of
>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.  My
>>>> questions:
>>>>
>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
>>>> everything
>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
>>>> still
>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>>> HDs.
>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
>>>> will
>>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to get
>>>> W7
>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
>>>> of
>>>> my
>>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
>>>> and
>>>> two
>>>> XP systems.
>>>>
>>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>>> don't
>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch to
>>>> W7
>>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>>> capability
>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>>> back
>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable with
>>>> W7.
>>>>
>>>> Any problem with doing this?


>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> bobster:
>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another option
>> you might want to consider...
>>
>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
>> Casper
>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
>> released
>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
>> assuming,
>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as well.
>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
>> capability.)
>>
>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the extent
>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
>> that
>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
>> systems?
>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
>> contain the contents of both OSs.
>>
>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
>> HDD
>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
>> priority
>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
>> matter
>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>>
>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
>> Anna
>
>
> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> Anna,
>>
>> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but since
>> my
>> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for
>> me
>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been able
>> to
>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
>> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I
>> also
>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>>
>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
>> each
>> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support
>> section
>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>>
>> Thanks again for your help.


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

> bobster:
> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal situation.
> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port it
> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
> device.
> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
> the
> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
> external
> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>
> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
> is
> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
>
> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk Management
> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no difficulty
> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
> current
> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
> clone
> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
>
> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
> Management
> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
> shown
> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click on
> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the sub-menu.
> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
> that the system will boot to the external disk.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
> bought the  full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD.  The other end
> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board.  I've never
> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
> capable Vantec external enclosure.
>
> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have been
> discussing.  As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one.  They each
> have
> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
> 3
> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
> or
> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
> size of the  drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
> will
> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
> internal
> drive to a partition on the external drive.  If that happens I would
> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
>
> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive formatting,
> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for XP
> and Windows 7.  Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
> the
> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
> g
> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
> XP/IE-8
> on it) to this HD.  This sounds  complicated but I can change a drive in
> the
> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
>
> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
> there
> is no hurry to do anything.
>
> Any additional comments will be appreciated.


bobster:
It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
external HDD is to...
1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
cloned contents of each OS.

Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You haven't
indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those two
systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you create
would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?

I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be single-partitioned.
Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
these drives.

Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of *no*
relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
example...

Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS. Assuming
the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the system
will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
assignment.

Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.

Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2, the
system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what we
are discussing.

And so on & so on...

Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you decide
to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you originally
multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act as
the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.

You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as the
recipient of those cloned contents.

So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your XP
& Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your external
HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned XP
OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that the
BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.

Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.

Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
sensible one under your circumstances.
Anna



0
bobster
2/6/2010 4:28:30 AM
>>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to 
>>>>> the
>>>>> same
>>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a
>>>>> gift
>>>>> of
>>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives. 
>>>>> My
>>>>> questions:
>>>>>
>>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
>>>>> everything
>>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
>>>>> still
>>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>>>> HDs.
>>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
>>>>> will
>>>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to 
>>>>> get
>>>>> W7
>>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
>>>>> of
>>>>> my
>>>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
>>>>> and
>>>>> two
>>>>> XP systems.
>>>>>
>>>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>>>> don't
>>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch 
>>>>> to
>>>>> W7
>>>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>>>> capability
>>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>>>> back
>>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable 
>>>>> with
>>>>> W7.
>>>>>
>>>>> Any problem with doing this?


>>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>>> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> bobster:
>>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another 
>>> option
>>> you might want to consider...
>>>
>>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
>>> Casper
>>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
>>> released
>>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
>>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
>>> assuming,
>>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as 
>>> well.
>>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
>>> capability.)
>>>
>>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the 
>>> extent
>>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
>>> that
>>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
>>> systems?
>>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
>>> contain the contents of both OSs.
>>>
>>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
>>> HDD
>>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
>>> priority
>>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
>>> matter
>>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>>>
>>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
>>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
>>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
>>> Anna


>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> Anna,
>>>
>>> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but 
>>> since
>>> my
>>> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
>>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for
>>> me
>>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been 
>>> able
>>> to
>>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
>>> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
>>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I
>>> also
>>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>>>
>>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
>>> each
>>> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support
>>> section
>>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>>>
>>> Thanks again for your help.


>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> bobster:
>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal 
>> situation.
>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port 
>> it
>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
>> device.
>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
>> the
>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
>> external
>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>>
>> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
>> is
>> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
>> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
>> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
>>
>> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk 
>> Management
>> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no 
>> difficulty
>> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
>> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
>> current
>> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
>> clone
>> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
>>
>> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
>> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
>> Management
>> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
>> shown
>> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click 
>> on
>> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the 
>> sub-menu.
>> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
>> that the system will boot to the external disk.
>> Anna
>
>
> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> Anna,
>>
>> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
>> bought the  full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
>> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD.  The other end
>> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board.  I've never
>> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
>> capable Vantec external enclosure.
>>
>> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have 
>> been
>> discussing.  As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
>> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one.  They each
>> have
>> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
>> 3
>> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
>> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
>> or
>> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
>> size of the  drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
>> will
>> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
>> internal
>> drive to a partition on the external drive.  If that happens I would
>> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
>> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
>>
>> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive 
>> formatting,
>> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
>> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for 
>> XP
>> and Windows 7.  Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
>> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
>> the
>> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
>> g
>> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
>> XP/IE-8
>> on it) to this HD.  This sounds  complicated but I can change a drive in
>> the
>> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
>>
>> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
>> there
>> is no hurry to do anything.
>>
>> Any additional comments will be appreciated.


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> bobster:
> It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
> your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
> operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
> external HDD is to...
> 1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
> 2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
> 3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
> disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
> of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
> multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
> cloned contents of each OS.
>
> Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
> contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You 
> haven't
> indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those 
> two
> systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you 
> create
> would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
> particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?
>
> I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be 
> single-partitioned.
> Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
> these drives.
>
> Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of 
> *no*
> relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
> example...
>
> Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
> installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS. 
> Assuming
> the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the 
> system
> will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
> assignment.
>
> Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
> secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
> assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
> operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.
>
> Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
> the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2, 
> the
> system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
> letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
> also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
> drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
> i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what 
> we
> are discussing.
>
> And so on & so on...
>
> Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you 
> decide
> to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
> previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you 
> originally
> multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
> assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
> present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act 
> as
> the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
> your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
> that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
> having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.
>
> You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
> contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as 
> the
> recipient of those cloned contents.
>
> So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your 
> XP
> & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
> been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your 
> external
> HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
> contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned 
> XP
> OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
> first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
> explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that 
> the
> BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
> The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
> receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
> Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
> drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
> latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.
>
> Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
> boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
> partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
> order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
>
> Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
> objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
> sensible one under your circumstances.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:ei4HZTupKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me 
> regarding
> the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode.  Since I haven't
> downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size.  The XP
> installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess 
> that
> the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that.  I would think that 
> 3
> 80 gig partitions on the external drive  would be about right.  I will let
> you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.


bobster:
Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out 
for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach, 
then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you 
previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course 
to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any 
significant changes.

I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your 
external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm in 
doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly 
approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with a 
320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both of 
the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to contain 
other data of one sort or another.

But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as to 
how things worked out.
Anna 


0
Anna
2/6/2010 4:08:25 PM
Anna,

Last night I was able to successfully partition my Vantec mounted HD into 3 
volumes of approximately 80g each with the remaining space left un- 
partitioned.  These 3 new partitions each have a new drive letter assigned. 
I used Casper to clone the "C" drive volume of my active drive to one of the 
"new" partitions on the external Vantec mounted drive.  I then was able to 
successfully boot my XP system from that drive.  As you guessed, It is my 
intent to use the three partitions as XP and Win7 backups and the third 
partition for general storage such as pictures, etc.


BTW, I used a free partitioning utility, EASUS Partition Master 5.0.1, to 
partition the external drive.  It was easy to use and did the job with a 
minimum of fuss.

My next task will be to install Win 7 on my second internal HD.  I'll 
probably tackle that in the next few days.  I'll let you know the result.  I 
have run the Windows 7 upgrade advisor from MS and with a few minor 
exceptions, it looks like I am good to go.

===========================================================
"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message 
news:ejwFma0pKHA.5840@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...

>>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to
>>>>> the
>>>>> same
>>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a
>>>>> gift
>>>>> of
>>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.
>>>>> My
>>>>> questions:
>>>>>
>>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
>>>>> everything
>>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
>>>>> still
>>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>>>> HDs.
>>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
>>>>> will
>>>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to
>>>>> get
>>>>> W7
>>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
>>>>> of
>>>>> my
>>>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
>>>>> and
>>>>> two
>>>>> XP systems.
>>>>>
>>>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>>>> don't
>>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch
>>>>> to
>>>>> W7
>>>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>>>> capability
>>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>>>> back
>>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable
>>>>> with
>>>>> W7.
>>>>>
>>>>> Any problem with doing this?


>>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>>> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> bobster:
>>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another
>>> option
>>> you might want to consider...
>>>
>>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
>>> Casper
>>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
>>> released
>>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
>>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
>>> assuming,
>>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as
>>> well.
>>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
>>> capability.)
>>>
>>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the
>>> extent
>>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
>>> that
>>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
>>> systems?
>>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
>>> contain the contents of both OSs.
>>>
>>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
>>> HDD
>>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
>>> priority
>>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
>>> matter
>>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>>>
>>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
>>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
>>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
>>> Anna


>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> Anna,
>>>
>>> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but
>>> since
>>> my
>>> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
>>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for
>>> me
>>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been
>>> able
>>> to
>>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
>>> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
>>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I
>>> also
>>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>>>
>>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
>>> each
>>> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support
>>> section
>>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>>>
>>> Thanks again for your help.


>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> bobster:
>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
>> situation.
>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
>> it
>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
>> device.
>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
>> the
>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
>> external
>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>>
>> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
>> is
>> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
>> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
>> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
>>
>> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk
>> Management
>> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no
>> difficulty
>> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
>> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
>> current
>> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
>> clone
>> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
>>
>> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
>> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
>> Management
>> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
>> shown
>> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click
>> on
>> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the
>> sub-menu.
>> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
>> that the system will boot to the external disk.
>> Anna
>
>
> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> Anna,
>>
>> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
>> bought the  full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
>> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD.  The other end
>> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board.  I've never
>> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
>> capable Vantec external enclosure.
>>
>> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have
>> been
>> discussing.  As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
>> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one.  They each
>> have
>> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
>> 3
>> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
>> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
>> or
>> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
>> size of the  drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
>> will
>> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
>> internal
>> drive to a partition on the external drive.  If that happens I would
>> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
>> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
>>
>> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive
>> formatting,
>> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
>> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for
>> XP
>> and Windows 7.  Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
>> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
>> the
>> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
>> g
>> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
>> XP/IE-8
>> on it) to this HD.  This sounds  complicated but I can change a drive in
>> the
>> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
>>
>> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
>> there
>> is no hurry to do anything.
>>
>> Any additional comments will be appreciated.


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> bobster:
> It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
> your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
> operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
> external HDD is to...
> 1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
> 2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
> 3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
> disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
> of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
> multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
> cloned contents of each OS.
>
> Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
> contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You
> haven't
> indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those
> two
> systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you
> create
> would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
> particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?
>
> I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be
> single-partitioned.
> Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
> these drives.
>
> Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of
> *no*
> relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
> example...
>
> Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
> installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS.
> Assuming
> the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the
> system
> will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
> assignment.
>
> Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
> secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
> assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
> operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.
>
> Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
> the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2,
> the
> system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
> letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
> also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
> drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
> i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what
> we
> are discussing.
>
> And so on & so on...
>
> Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you
> decide
> to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
> previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you
> originally
> multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
> assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
> present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act
> as
> the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
> your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
> that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
> having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.
>
> You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
> contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as
> the
> recipient of those cloned contents.
>
> So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your
> XP
> & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
> been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your
> external
> HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
> contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned
> XP
> OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
> first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
> explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that
> the
> BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
> The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
> receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
> Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
> drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
> latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.
>
> Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
> boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
> partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
> order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
>
> Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
> objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
> sensible one under your circumstances.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:ei4HZTupKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me
> regarding
> the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode.  Since I haven't
> downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size.  The XP
> installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess
> that
> the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that.  I would think that
> 3
> 80 gig partitions on the external drive  would be about right.  I will let
> you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.


bobster:
Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
significant changes.

I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm in
doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with a
320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both of
the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to contain
other data of one sort or another.

But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as to
how things worked out.
Anna



0
bobster
2/6/2010 5:54:53 PM
Anna,

I have been reading up on the possible pitfalls when downloading Windows 7 
to an operating  XP computer.  One quotation (see below) kinda scared me as 
I definitely do not want to affect in any way, or lose my XP capability.

"When installing a computer operating system, you will need to reinstall all 
existing hardware (i.e. printers, network cards, etc.)."

My question:

If, when I get Win 7 installed and "all existing hardware (i.e. printers, 
network cards, etc.) have been reinstalled (changed to suit Win7, I assume), 
and I decide to boot up to one of my HDs that have the XP system on it, will 
I still have a completely unmodified operational XP system or will the 
hardware interface changes made to accommodate Win 7 screw up my XP 
operation?

Sorry if I sound like an old worry wart (I'm 80) but I'm somewhat paranoid 
about screwing up or losing my superbly operating XP based system.

TIA for you answer


"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message 
news:ejwFma0pKHA.5840@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...

>>>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>>>> news:#Rus98TpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>>> I have a Dell Inspiron 530, Intel dual 2.2 CPU computer running
>>>>> XP/Sp3/IE8
>>>>> with all updates.  It has 3 identical, 320G SATA HDs, all cloned to
>>>>> the
>>>>> same
>>>>> software, and 2 gigs of memory.  The three HDs are located in the two
>>>>> internal positions and one external enclosure.  I have been given a
>>>>> gift
>>>>> of
>>>>> a legal Windows 7 disk and wish to install W7 on one of the drives.
>>>>> My
>>>>> questions:
>>>>>
>>>>> If I install W7 on one of the HDs, I realize that the XP (and
>>>>> everything
>>>>> else) on that HD is gone and I have no problem with that as I will
>>>>> still
>>>>> have two fully operational XP systems and all my apps on the two other
>>>>> HDs.
>>>>> But will I still be able to boot up to these XP drives or will the
>>>>> installation of W7 change my BIOS settings or some other change that
>>>>> will
>>>>> prevent me from doing this.  What I really want to accomplish is to
>>>>> get
>>>>> W7
>>>>> up and running on one of my HDs but still be able to re-boot into one
>>>>> of
>>>>> my
>>>>> 2 remaining XP drives.  In other words, a triple boot, one W7 system
>>>>> and
>>>>> two
>>>>> XP systems.
>>>>>
>>>>> Why would I want to do this?  Well, my XP/IE8 works beautifully and I
>>>>> don't
>>>>> want to do anything to screw it up but I realize I'll have to switch
>>>>> to
>>>>> W7
>>>>> eventually.  The ideal situation for me would be to retain the XP
>>>>> capability
>>>>> on one HD, with another HD containing the clone of the first one for a
>>>>> back
>>>>> up, and the third HD with W7 as a learning tool to get comfortable
>>>>> with
>>>>> W7.
>>>>>
>>>>> Any problem with doing this?


>>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>>> news:O$GjBicpKHA.5588@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> bobster:
>>> In addition to the suggestion offered you by Peter, here's another
>>> option
>>> you might want to consider...
>>>
>>> If I recall correctly from a number of your prior posts you use the
>>> Casper
>>> disk-cloning program. I'm assuming you've upgraded to the recently
>>> released
>>> Casper 6 program so you probably know that the program now has the happy
>>> capability of booting the cloned contents from a USB external HDD
>>> assuming,
>>> of course, that your motherboard's BIOS supports that capability as
>>> well.
>>> (I'm virtually (but not absolutely!) certain your Dell has that
>>> capability.)
>>>
>>> So why not use the USBEHD as your "destination" drive, even to the
>>> extent
>>> (should you desire) of dividing its disk space into two partitions so
>>> that
>>> the device can contain the cloned contents of both your XP & Win7
>>> systems?
>>> Naturally I'm assuming your USBEHD would have sufficient disk space to
>>> contain the contents of both OSs.
>>>
>>> One of your internal HDDs would contain the XP OS and the other internal
>>> HDD
>>> would contain the Win7 OS. Presumably you would set the BIOS boot
>>> priority
>>> order to whichever drive you usually boot to but it would be a simple
>>> matter
>>> to change the boot priority order as the need arises.
>>>
>>> Thus your USBEHD would serve as comprehensive backups of both operating
>>> systems and should the need arise where you need to boot to either OS
>>> contained on the USBEHD it would be a simple matter to do so.
>>> Anna


>> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
>> news:u2ATKzepKHA.3748@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> Anna,
>>>
>>> Thanks for the sage advice.  Yes, I have upgraded to Casper 6.0 but
>>> since
>>> my
>>> external HD enclosure is connected via a  SATA port, the new USB boot
>>> capability didn't provide much usable new capability.  Not a problem for
>>> me
>>> as both 5.0, and now 6.0 are super reliable,  and I have always been
>>> able
>>> to
>>> boot from the external enclosure-mounted HD as it is connected to a SATA
>>> port via an eSATA cable.  And yes, you are correct, my Dell Inspiron 530
>>> supports USB2 and has the F12 capability to select the boot drive.  I
>>> also
>>> know how to change the boot order in the BIOS via the F2 button.
>>>
>>> What I have never done is to format a drive into multiple partitions ,
>>> each
>>> with a new drive letter.  The procedure in the XP Help and Support
>>> section
>>> sounds pretty straightforward so I'll probably give it a try.
>>>
>>> Thanks again for your help.


>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
>> news:eDIWoAnpKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> bobster:
>> Your having an external enclosure that has SATA-to-SATA connectivity
>> (presumably in addition to USB-connectivity) is really an ideal
>> situation.
>> Since (AFAIK) your Dell Inspiron 530 is not equipped with an eSATA port
>> it
>> didn't occur to me that you were working with that type of external
>> device.
>> I would guess that you've either installed a eSATA (or SATA) adapter in
>> the
>> desktop machine to achieve that capability or directly connect your
>> external
>> device to an available SATA connector on the motherboard.
>>
>> In any event the fact that you can directly boot from the external device
>> is
>> certainly an advantage. And (usually) a SATA-connected HDD considerably
>> outperforms a USB-connected HDD assuming USB 2.0 capability. (Things may
>> dramatically change when we move to USB 3.0).
>>
>> It's really a simple & straightforward matter using the XP Disk
>> Management
>> snap-in to multi-partition the external HDD. You should have no
>> difficulty
>> doing so. Since (I assume) you will be using the external HDD as your
>> "destination" drive you can start "fresh" so to speak and delete the
>> current
>> partition on that drive and then multi-partition the drive and finally
>> clone
>> the contents of the two OSs to the appropriate partition.
>>
>> If & when the time comes when you need to directly boot to one of the two
>> cloned systems on the external HDD you would ordinarily use Disk
>> Management
>> to "Mark Partition as Active" (assuming that partition is not already
>> shown
>> as the "active" partition). All that's involved is a simple right-click
>> on
>> the drive's listing and selecting the preceding command from the
>> sub-menu.
>> And, of course, change the boot priority order in the BIOS upon bootup so
>> that the system will boot to the external disk.
>> Anna
>
>
> "bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
> news:u0uYf$rpKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> Anna,
>>
>> Yes, my Inspiron 530 did not have an eSATA port as delivered but when I
>> bought the  full up WD 320 gig HD kit, it came with an eSATA cable and a
>> rear mounted port connector assembly for an external HD.  The other end
>> connected to one of the unused SATA ports on my mother board.  I've never
>> had any problem in booting from this HD which is mounted in an eSATA/USB
>> capable Vantec external enclosure.
>>
>> I still have a few concerns about proceeding with the changes we have
>> been
>> discussing.  As I mentioned, I have 3 identical HDs, mounted in internal
>> position 1, internal position 2, and the Vantec mounted one.  They each
>> have
>> been assigned a single drive letter (C, E, and F) although they each have
>> 3
>> partitions. One of my concerns is if I use the external mounted one as my
>> destination drive, and re-partition it into 2 or more partitions, with 2
>> or
>> more new drive letters, each of those partitions will be smaller than the
>> size of the  drive letter partitions on the two internal drives. Casper
>> will
>> probably tell me that there isn't enough free space to clone either
>> internal
>> drive to a partition on the external drive.  If that happens I would
>> probably junk the whole process, especially if it meant I would have to
>> re-partition my internal drive to mirror my external destination drive.
>>
>> I know the above sounds like the rantings of a novice in drive
>> formatting,
>> but having a trouble-free XP/IE-8 system, I am reluctant to try and
>> re-format it's HD in order to accommodate a single HD backup system for
>> XP
>> and Windows 7.  Maybe I should just leave things as they are currently
>> configured, download Windows 7 onto my first internal HD, clone that to
>> the
>> Vantec external drive, then replace the HD in the Vantec with another 320
>> g
>> WD (which I already have) and clone the second internal drive (with
>> XP/IE-8
>> on it) to this HD.  This sounds  complicated but I can change a drive in
>> the
>> Vantec in about 5 minutes.
>>
>> I'm going to "cool it" for a few days while I decide how to proceed as
>> there
>> is no hurry to do anything.
>>
>> Any additional comments will be appreciated.


> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:OYKd2EupKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> bobster:
> It seems to me that the most straightforward & efficient configuration in
> your situation based upon your objective of working with two different
> operating systems and having at your disposal two internal HDDs plus an
> external HDD is to...
> 1. Install the XP system on one internal HDD.
> 2. Install the Win7 system on the other internal HDD.
> 3. Utilize your external HDD as the "destination" HDD, and use your Casper
> disk-cloning program as the vehicle to contain the cloned contents of each
> of the two internal HDDs. As I previously indicated you would
> multi-partition the external HDD into two partitions to accommodate the
> cloned contents of each OS.
>
> Naturally this assumes that the 320 GB external HDD you're working with
> contains sufficient disk space to contain those cloned contents. You
> haven't
> indicated the total amount of data you're working with in each of those
> two
> systems but I'm assuming each of the external drive's partitions you
> create
> would be sufficient in size to accommodate the cloned contents of that
> particular OS. Is that a reasonable assumption?
>
> I'm also assuming each of your two internal HDDs will be
> single-partitioned.
> Given the configuration I'm suggesting I see no reason to multi-partition
> these drives.
>
> Forget about drive letter assignments re the external HDD. They are of
> *no*
> relevance in this situation. The same is true of your internal HDDs. As an
> example...
>
> Let's say your XP OS is installed on internal HDD #1 and your Win7 OS is
> installed on internal HDD #2. Now you decide to boot to your XP OS.
> Assuming
> the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to HDD #1 the
> system
> will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive letter
> assignment.
>
> Since your second internal HDD containing the Win7 is also connected as a
> secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C: drive letter
> assignment. Again the drive letter assigned to that drive during this
> operation is of no consequence based upon what we are discussing.
>
> Let's say at another time you now desire to boot to your Win7 OS. Assuming
> the BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your HDD #2,
> the
> system will boot to that drive which of course will receive the C: drive
> letter assignment. Since your first internal HDD containing the XP OS is
> also connected as a secondary HDD at this point it will receive a non-C:
> drive letter assignment. Again, the drive letter assigned to that drive,
> i.e., "HDD #1" during this operation is of no consequence based upon what
> we
> are discussing.
>
> And so on & so on...
>
> Now let's say that while you've booted to your XP OS ("HDD #1"), you
> decide
> to clone the contents of that drive to one of the two partitions you
> previously created on your external HDD. Understand that when you
> originally
> multi-partitioned that external HDD into two partitions the drive letters
> assigned to each of those partitions is of no consequence in terms of our
> present discussion except in "telling" Casper which partition should act
> as
> the destination drive for the purposes of receiving the cloned contents of
> your HDD #1. Let's say, as an example, you will be cloning the contents of
> that drive to the F: partition on the external HDD, the other partition
> having been assigned the G: drive letter assignment.
>
> You will use the same basic process to clone the contents of your Win7 OS
> contained on internal HDD #2, but this time using the "G:" partition as
> the
> recipient of those cloned contents.
>
> So now you have your external HDD containing the cloned contents of your
> XP
> & Win7 systems. The fact that the two partitions on the external HDD have
> been designated F: & G: are really of no relevance here. Since your
> external
> HDD is a bootable device you will be able to boot to either of the OSs
> contained on the external HDD. Let's say you desire to boot to the cloned
> XP
> OS contained on partition F:. (As I previously indicated you will have to
> first ensure that the selected partition is marked "Active"; I previously
> explained that simple process using Disk Management) . Then ensure that
> the
> BIOS boot priority order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
> The system will then boot to the cloned XP OS on your external HDD and
> receive a C: drive letter assignment. The partition containing the cloned
> Win7 OS will receive a non-C: letter assignment, possibly retaining the G:
> drive letter assignment. In any event the drive letter assigned to the
> latter partition is of no relevance re our discussion.
>
> Once again, you would follow the same basic process should you desire to
> boot to the cloned Win7 OS on the external HDD. Again ensuring that the
> partition containing that OS is marked "Active" and the BIOS boot priority
> order indicates a first HDD boot to your external HDD.
>
> Obviously there are different approaches one can take to meet your
> objectives but as I stated I believe the approach I'm suggesting is a
> sensible one under your circumstances.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:ei4HZTupKHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Thanks again for clarifying several things that were bothering me
> regarding
> the use of the external drive in a multi partition mode.  Since I haven't
> downloaded the Windows 7 OS yet, I don't know its footprint size.  The XP
> installation is about 40 gigs including all of my apps so I would guess
> that
> the W7 installation sans apps would be less than that.  I would think that
> 3
> 80 gig partitions on the external drive  would be about right.  I will let
> you know how it works out when I finally decide to tackle it.


bobster:
Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
significant changes.

I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm in
doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with a
320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both of
the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to contain
other data of one sort or another.

But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as to
how things worked out.
Anna



0
bobster
2/6/2010 7:48:56 PM
> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:ejwFma0pKHA.5840@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> bobster:
> Well give the configuration I've suggested a try and see how it works out
> for you. If after working with it you're dissatisfied with that approach,
> then simply try another configuration possibly along the lines you
> previously contemplated. Nearly needless to say you will be sure of course
> to maintain comprehensive backups of your system(s) when making any
> significant changes.
>
> I'm not clear on why you would want to create *three* partitions on your
> external HDD rather than two. Certainly there would be no problem or harm 
> in
> doing so since you've indicated you're working with total data roughly
> approximating 40 GB in each of the two OSs so since you'll be working with 
> a
> 320 GB HDD it would seem there's plenty of disk space to accommodate both 
> of
> the OSs. I suppose you're contemplating using the third partition to 
> contain
> other data of one sort or another.
>
> But whatever you decide it would be interesting to later hear from you as 
> to
> how things worked out.
> Anna


"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:uF2c$V1pKHA.1552@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> Last night I was able to successfully partition my Vantec mounted HD into 
> 3
> volumes of approximately 80g each with the remaining space left un-
> partitioned.  These 3 new partitions each have a new drive letter 
> assigned.
> I used Casper to clone the "C" drive volume of my active drive to one of 
> the
> "new" partitions on the external Vantec mounted drive.  I then was able to
> successfully boot my XP system from that drive.  As you guessed, It is my
> intent to use the three partitions as XP and Win7 backups and the third
> partition for general storage such as pictures, etc.
>
>
> BTW, I used a free partitioning utility, EASUS Partition Master 5.0.1, to
> partition the external drive.  It was easy to use and did the job with a
> minimum of fuss.
>
> My next task will be to install Win 7 on my second internal HD.  I'll
> probably tackle that in the next few days.  I'll let you know the result. 
> I
> have run the Windows 7 upgrade advisor from MS and with a few minor
> exceptions, it looks like I am good to go.


bobster:
As previously discussed there's certainly no harm in creating three 
partitions on your external HDD and since you plan to use that third 
partition for specialized data backup it makes sense to have 
multi-partitioned the drive in the way you did.

But why did you leave "unallocated" disk space on the disk? Are you planning 
to utilize that disk space sometime in the future for add'l data storage? 
Just curious.

While there's no harm in using the EASEUS Partition Master program to 
undertake the disk partitioning scheme - it's a fine program based on the 
limited experience I've had with it - there really was no reason why you 
couldn't have used Disk Management to carry out the multi-partitioning of 
your external HDD.

Are you aware that you could have also used your Casper disk-cloning program 
to multi-partition your external HDD as well? It's one of the nice features 
of the program. Ordinarily you would do this when you initially clone the 
contents of your "source" drive to the external HDD. For example, let's say 
you intended to clone the contents of your XP OS on your internal HDD #1 to 
the external drive. You could use Casper to create the partition on the 
external HDD of whatever size you desired (as long, of course, that it was 
sufficient in size to hold the cloned contents). Then undertake the same 
process when you cloned the contents of your Win7 OS on your internal HDD #2 
to the external HDD. And finally create one or more partitions on the 
unallocated disk space of the external HDD should there be any unallocated 
disk space remaining.
Anna



0
Anna
2/6/2010 8:30:59 PM
"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:%23cmOuV2pKHA.1544@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> I have been reading up on the possible pitfalls when downloading Windows 7
> to an operating  XP computer.  One quotation (see below) kinda scared me 
> as
> I definitely do not want to affect in any way, or lose my XP capability.
>
> "When installing a computer operating system, you will need to reinstall 
> all
> existing hardware (i.e. printers, network cards, etc.)."
>
> My question:
>
> If, when I get Win 7 installed and "all existing hardware (i.e. printers,
> network cards, etc.) have been reinstalled (changed to suit Win7, I 
> assume),
> and I decide to boot up to one of my HDs that have the XP system on it, 
> will
> I still have a completely unmodified operational XP system or will the
> hardware interface changes made to accommodate Win 7 screw up my XP
> operation?
>
> Sorry if I sound like an old worry wart (I'm 80) but I'm somewhat paranoid
> about screwing up or losing my superbly operating XP based system.
>
> TIA for you answer


bobster:
No, there's no problem here that will affect your XP system since your XP OS 
will be installed on one HDD and the Win7 OS on another HDD. So when you 
boot to your XP OS (as previously discussed) the system will detect only 
those drivers, configurations, etc. that have been installed in connection 
with your XP OS. And when you boot to your Win7 OS (with the HDD containing 
the XP OS now a secondary HDD in the system) there will similarly be no 
adverse impact on your XP OS re Win7 drivers, configurations, etc. under 
those circumstances.
Anna 


0
Anna
2/6/2010 9:25:08 PM
Anna,

I've hit a snag.  When I partition my external HD into 3 partitions, only 
one (always the first) partition can contain a bootable volume.  The second 
and third partitions have unique drive letters assigned but my BIOS 
recognizes only the first volume drive letter in its lists of bootable 
drives.  I have found no way of changing the BIOS to overcome this 
limitation.

When I go to XP disk management, the first volume shows up as the "primary 
partition" while the second and third volumes show up as "extended partition 
logical drives".  When I right click on either of these two partitions, 
there is no "mark partition as active" option as there is when right 
clicking the first partition. I have tried using XP, EASEUS and Casper to 
partition the external HD into 3 partitions and all resulted in three 
partitions in which only partition one could be used to boot.  The 
limitation may possibly be in the Casper cloning concept but I have read 
their use notes and can't find an answer to the problem.

At this point it appears to me that I cannot have two bootable partitions on 
a single hard drive unless I go to a true dual boot configuration for W7 and 
XP.  At this point I am considering reverting to my "plan" B approach, i.e. 
using two separate external HDs in the Vantec enclosure.  I have an extra HD 
and changing them in the enclosure is a five minute task.

If you have any other thoughts let me know.

TIA
"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message news:uSSphL3pKHA 
HDs.3980@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...

"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message
news:%23cmOuV2pKHA.1544@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> I have been reading up on the possible pitfalls when downloading Windows 7
> to an operating  XP computer.  One quotation (see below) kinda scared me
> as
> I definitely do not want to affect in any way, or lose my XP capability.
>
> "When installing a computer operating system, you will need to reinstall
> all
> existing hardware (i.e. printers, network cards, etc.)."
>
> My question:
>
> If, when I get Win 7 installed and "all existing hardware (i.e. printers,
> network cards, etc.) have been reinstalled (changed to suit Win7, I
> assume),
> and I decide to boot up to one of my HDs that have the XP system on it,
> will
> I still have a completely unmodified operational XP system or will the
> hardware interface changes made to accommodate Win 7 screw up my XP
> operation?
>
> Sorry if I sound like an old worry wart (I'm 80) but I'm somewhat paranoid
> about screwing up or losing my superbly operating XP based system.
>
> TIA for you answer


bobster:
No, there's no problem here that will affect your XP system since your XP OS
will be installed on one HDD and the Win7 OS on another HDD. So when you
boot to your XP OS (as previously discussed) the system will detect only
those drivers, configurations, etc. that have been installed in connection
with your XP OS. And when you boot to your Win7 OS (with the HDD containing
the XP OS now a secondary HDD in the system) there will similarly be no
adverse impact on your XP OS re Win7 drivers, configurations, etc. under
those circumstances.
Anna



0
bobster
2/7/2010 9:07:31 PM
"bobster" <fauxie@bogus.net> wrote in message 
news:ulqlTmDqKHA.4836@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Anna,
>
> I've hit a snag.  When I partition my external HD into 3 partitions, only
> one (always the first) partition can contain a bootable volume.  The 
> second
> and third partitions have unique drive letters assigned but my BIOS
> recognizes only the first volume drive letter in its lists of bootable
> drives.  I have found no way of changing the BIOS to overcome this
> limitation.
>
> When I go to XP disk management, the first volume shows up as the "primary
> partition" while the second and third volumes show up as "extended 
> partition
> logical drives".  When I right click on either of these two partitions,
> there is no "mark partition as active" option as there is when right
> clicking the first partition. I have tried using XP, EASEUS and Casper to
> partition the external HD into 3 partitions and all resulted in three
> partitions in which only partition one could be used to boot.  The
> limitation may possibly be in the Casper cloning concept but I have read
> their use notes and can't find an answer to the problem.
>
> At this point it appears to me that I cannot have two bootable partitions 
> on
> a single hard drive unless I go to a true dual boot configuration for W7 
> and
> XP.  At this point I am considering reverting to my "plan" B approach, 
> i.e.
> using two separate external HDs in the Vantec enclosure.  I have an extra 
> HD
> and changing them in the enclosure is a five minute task.
>
> If you have any other thoughts let me know.


bobster:
As I previously indicated you will use the XP Disk Management utility to 
"Mark Partition as Active" depending upon which partition contains the 
bootable OS (on your external HDD) that you wish to boot to. Using your 
example where (presumably) you've cloned the contents of your XP OS to the 
first partition on your external HDD and you've cloned the contents of your 
Win7 OS to the second partition on the external HDD (the third partition on 
the external HDD does not contain a bootable OS according to the info you 
previously provided)...

Assuming the first partition on the external HDD has been designated as 
"Active", the system will boot to that OS when your BIOS boot priority order 
setting indicates a first HDD boot to the external drive.

If, on the other hand, you desire to boot to the Win7 system it will be 
necessary use Disk Management as I explained above. You would right-click on 
the partition listing containing the Win7 OS and from the sub-menu select 
"Mark Partition as Active". The system will then boot to that OS when your 
BIOS boot priority order setting indicates a first HDD boot to the external 
disk.

Subsequently (after booting to your Win7 OS) when you want to boot to your 
XP OS you will need to go through the same process but this time "marking" 
the partition containing the XP OS as "Active".

Please understand that the BIOS boot priority relates to a specific HDD 
installed in the system. Where the HDD contains multiple bootable OSs (as 
you have on your external HDD) the boot will be to the "Active" partition on 
that disk. Thus the need for making ("marking") that partition "Active".

You might want to refer to my previous posts in this thread in which I 
further explained the above in a bit more detail with reference to your 
specific situation.
Anna 


0
Anna
2/7/2010 11:33:22 PM
Reply:

Similar Artilces:

xp/vista incompatability?
I created several pub files using office 2007. I pasted in multiple Word docs created with two computers, one using XP, the other using Vista. The files using docs from both computers will not open ("publisher cannot open this file" error). I ran a test with 6 Word docs created on XP pasted into a publisher file, opened closed it with Vista computer, no problem. Pasted 1 Word doc created on Vista into the same file then closed and tried to reopen document but got the aformentioned error message. I tried the registry fixes Mary Sauer suggested but no results. Thumbnails of...

Hackers outwit Windows 7 activation
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9140947/Hackers_outwit_Windows_7_activation Yesiree, activation and becoming genuine only affects paying customers while the hackers just laugh. Alias "Alias" <alias@dontspam.com.invalid> wrote in message news:hdugcc$n98$1@news.eternal-september.org... > http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9140947/Hackers_outwit_Windows_7_activation > > Yesiree, activation and becoming genuine only affects paying customers > while the hackers just laugh. > > Alias There will always be deadbeats like yourself w...

Installation of Office XP SP3 issue...
I am using the Outlook 2002 client. Since I have installed Office XP "Service Pack 3", I have noticed that each time a mail message arrives in my mailbox, a window pop's up stating that ... A program is trying to access email addresss you have stored in Outlook. Do you want to allow this? etc... This is really annoying. How do I turn this off?? Thanks, Brad See http://www.slipstick.com/outlook/ol2002sp3.htm#problems -- Sue Mosher, Outlook MVP Author of Microsoft Outlook Programming - Jumpstart for Administrators, Power Users, and Developers http://www.outl...

How to prevent a user to move a window
Hi, I would like to know how prevent someone from moving the window of my app. It is not a fullscreen window but I want to prevent any movement. "mosfet" <tricubes@wanadoo.fr> wrote in message news:bs9rka$560$1@news-reader5.wanadoo.fr... > Hi, > > I would like to know how prevent someone from moving the window of my app. > It is not a fullscreen window but I want to prevent any movement. You can try handling WM_NCHITTEST and calling DefWindowProc. When you get back HTCAPTION return instead HTNOWHERE. You'll probably want to remove or disable the 'Move&#...

Office for Windows
Operating System: Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) Processor: Intel I have Office for windows vista. Is there any way to use it on a mac? Well, there is no "Office for windows vista", so what you most likely have is Office 2007 which will run on the Vista version of the Windows operating system but will also run on several other versions. In direct answer to your question, however, the answer is "yes... but": You can install Windows XP or Vista on an Intel Mac running OS X 10.5 if you create a separate drive partition & use Apple's Boot Camp. You would have to reboot your...

can't use windows mail, help
have been using windows mail regularly for months and even last night however today it decides to ask to logon and when i put in username and password it doesnt accept it. I have gone to tools, accounts, properties, servers and the password authentication box is unchecked, but still it asks me to logon. First, test your password by logging in to your provider's webmail. . If that works, it proves you have the correct username and password. A likely reason for the username/password failing in Windows Mail is=20 account corruption. One thing you should try as a possible quick fi...

After XP sp2 upgrade, Outlook 2003 crashes every time a Contact is saved or links to other contacts added to it
The subject line says it all. On my Toshiba Tablet PC, "After XP sp2 upgrade, Outlook 2003 crashes every time a Contact is saved or links to other contacts added to it" (via the Contact's "Contacts..." link button). The error signature is always the same: AppName: outlook.exe AppVer: 11.0.6353.0 AppStamp:408f2937 ModName: mso.dll ModVer: 11.0.6360.0 ModStamp:40d147de fDebug: 0 Offset: 0001f0e3d And I always send a report to Microsoft (about 115K each), but there is no response giving a fix as there sometimes is. With www.Microsoft.com -> Windows Update, I ha...

Problem with Refreshing Window Client Area
I am using Visual C++ 6.0 on Windows XP. I have a function that changes the palette and brightness settings for the image displayed in a window of type CScrollView. However, the colors are all messed up until I drag the window out of view and then drag it back into view again so that it gets repainted. Then it looks fine. I am looking for a call, to append to the end of the offending function, that refreshes the window client area the same way as dragging the window out of, and back into, view without actually having to drag the window. I have tried Invalidate(TRUE) and Invalidate(FALSE) ...

Office XP transfer of files to new PC
I am transfering files from my old PC to a new one and I want to take my Office XP just as it is on the old one to the new one; settings and all. Anyone know how to do this? First, you must reinstall Office. Then you can configure Outlook to use the same Outlook Data File (PST file) you were using before instead of the new blank one it created when you installed Outlook: - Go to Tools > Options > Mail Setup > Data Files > Add... - Add the PST you'd like as your new default, then Close > OK to exit the Options dialog - Go to Tools > E-mail Accounts > View or chan...

How to add DHCP mgmt console to XP
Hi Is there a way I can manage DHCP running on SBS2003, or at least look into the current lease list from an XP client? How can I run the dhcpmgmt.msc from an XP client? Thanks Franz Maybe RDC into the SBS from the XP client? -Larry -Please post the resolution to your issue so others may benefit. -Get Your SBS Health Check at www.sbsbpa.com > Hi > > Is there a way I can manage DHCP running on SBS2003, or at least look > into the current lease list from an XP client? > How can I run the dhcpmgmt.msc from an XP client? > Thanks > Franz Tha...

v10 Int Mgr settings for .ini file to see dyn windows being popula
In v8 and earlier I used to create a im.ini file that would open GP windows and show the integration running. How do you do this in v10? Thanks Ray Nist Ray, The setting hasn't change. [IMGPPrv] ShowDynamics=True Best regards, -- MG.- Mariano Gomez, MIS, MCP, PMP Maximum Global Business, LLC http://www.maximumglobalbusiness.com "Ray Nist" wrote: > In v8 and earlier I used to create a im.ini file that would open GP windows > and show the integration running. > > How do you do this in v10? > > Thanks > Ray Nist Thanks Mario. We set this and it ...

Microsoft Office XP excel 2003
When I open Excel 2003 the splash screen hangs for 30 seconds to about a minute and then excel opens and behaves normally. All other office programs such as Word etc open quickly and behave normally. If Excel is opened in safe mode , the program opens rapidly without any splash screen at all. Any explanations and indeed a cure for this behaviour ? Regards -- FLYNNE When you open excel in safe mode, you're not opening the addins or stuff in your XLStart folder or your customized toolbar. If you don't have lots of addins turned on and don't have lots of stuff in your XLS...

Publisher 2002 photo and graphic problems on xp
Microsoft Publisher 2002 works well on my old computer with Windows 98. However, I installed Pub. 2002 in my new computer with Windows XP and have many problems with photos and graphics just showing outline or no image at all. Is 2002 compatable with Windows XP? Yes, Publisher 2002 is compatible with Windows XP, it should work better than it did on 98. View, pictures, detailed display. If this isn't the solution.... Even though your computer is new, it doesn't necessarily mean your video driver is up to date. Try this: Slide the acceleration down on your adapter, control panel,...

Money 2001 and xp #2
Hi, I've been using money for some time but just recently I keep on getting this message " this opperation cannot be preformed " and each time I go from one account to onther this box keeps poping up and then the other box opens asking do I want to send this report to Microsoft can you suggest for me what to do i CAN'T SEEM TO GET ONTO MICROSOFT TO HELP ME OUT Regards Robert (Australia ) In microsoft.public.money, Robert Herod wrote: >I've been using money for some time but just recently I >keep on getting this message " this opperation cannot be &g...

Server Active Sync and Windows Mobile 5.0
Does any body know if there is a new version of the CertChk tool which is working with a Windows Mobile 5.0 device? The CertChk tool is not working with my new T-Mobile MDA Pro (WM50 device). I have no problems with a device running Windows Mobile 2003. Thanks for any help Regards Sandro Pizzingrilli ...

Folder sharing in XP Home vs. XP Pro?
Why is it that I can mount shared folders coming from my desktop running XP Pro onto my laptop running XP Home, but not vice-versa? I don't think I've done anything different between the two machines when sharing out folders. Yousuf Khan "Yousuf Khan" <bbbl67@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:4b4001f8$1@news.bnb-lp.com... > Why is it that I can mount shared folders coming from my desktop running > XP Pro onto my laptop running XP Home, but not vice-versa? I don't think > I've done anything different between the two machines when shar...

Can't Send Messages Using Outlook Web Access & XP
Our users with Windows XP cannot send messages using OWA. I've read a few KB articles about some incompatabilities between XP and OWA, but none of the proposed fixes (using the "basic" rather than "premium" client, or changing the security settings in IE) seem to solve this last problem. When they click on "send", it generates an unspecified "error on page". The problem occurs using IE and Firefox, but just on XP machines. My Windows 2000 machine works fine using IE and even my Macintosh using Safari (gasp!) works. ...

XP Pro desktop Search updates
Need to know the numbers of updates to XP desktop search. Particularly the one that lost me the dog (Search Companion) and gave me Desktop Search. The latest update is 4 and I have not installed that. Zeus cf. http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/windowsexperience/archive/2008/06/03/windows-search-4-0-released-to-web.aspx & http://support.microsoft.com/kb/940157 Zeus wrote: > Need to know the numbers of updates to XP desktop search. Particularly the > one that lost me the dog (Search Companion) and gave me Desktop Search. > The > latest update is 4 and I have...

AfxDaoInit fails on Win XP SP2
Hi, after deinstalling some test applications and then installing the Win XP SP2 a call to AfxDaoInit() fails with a CDaoException. This usually means that the Jet is missing. Windows however reports that the Jet is now part of the system so its not possible to install the latest Microsoft Jet 4.0 SP as well. Any idea how to check the presence of the Jet and solve the issue? Thank you for your time and help. Regards Thomas Trick ...

bunch of windows open in GP 10.0
Hello: Earlier today (Thursday), I finished my first GP 10.0 upgrade. The users really like it, but two of their users expressed a concern that I do not know how to address. When you open a bunch of windows—one right after the other—those windows “collapse” into the bottom of the user’s screen and into the Windows task bar (at the bottom of the monitor). I hope that makes sense. In fact, if you are conducting a lot of tasks such as printing multiple reports, you can find as many as 20 windows collapsed and down at the bottom of your monitor. The user has to open each window one b...

Outlook XP and VPN
My sales force can not use Outlook when they VPN to our network. Everything seems fine on the mail server. When they open Outlook, they see their mail, but can not do anything with it. Any suggestions? "=?Utf-8?B?UGVycnk=?=" <Perry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in news:915F9EA9-C3F8-42E9-A6E2-611B7AA19773@microsoft.com: > My sales force can not use Outlook when they VPN to our network. > Everything seems fine on the mail server. When they open Outlook, they > see their mail, but can not do anything with it. Any suggestions? What do you mean by "can't ...

UPGRADE XP HOME to XP PRO SP2
I have Windows XP Home, SP3 with latest updates. I purchased Retail Windows PRO with SP2 How do I upgrade my XP home to XP PRO? Either uninstall SP3 from Home Edition or slipstream SP3 into your XP Pro installation media and create a new installation CD. -- -- "LURKER" <feelingdumb@nowhere.net> wrote in message news:uCoY16PdKHA.5228@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl... >I have Windows XP Home, SP3 with latest updates. > > I purchased Retail Windows PRO with SP2 > > How do I upgrade my XP home to XP PRO? there is very little difference between ...

2000 Deluxe & Windows XP looks for disk at start up.
Installing 2000 Deluxe on XP Pro system works for awhile then spontaneously starts to look for a disk on startup. The msgbox caption is "No Disk" and the message is something like "Msmoney.exe Put disk in drive D:" The program will open after Ignoring, Retrying or Canceling the prompt. Its just annoying. I'm wondering if anyone knows of a command line switch that might fix the issue. Thanks lemo In microsoft.public.money, Lemo wrote: >Installing 2000 Deluxe on XP Pro system works for awhile then spontaneously >starts to look for a disk on startup. The m...

Check these corrective pack for Windows
--yigsmftkn Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="yoltzmlopope"; type="multipart/alternative" --yoltzmlopope Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="bhizbykrolb" --bhizbykrolb Content-Type: text/plain Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Microsoft Partner this is the latest version of security update, the "October 2003, Cumulative Patch" update which eliminates all known security vulnerabilities affecting MS Internet Explorer, MS Outlook and MS Outlook Express as well as three newly discovered vulnerabilities. Install now to help ...

Get/Change Operation Error in PM Transaction Entry Window
Hello, I was playing around in Fabrikam and entering some payables and receivables items and came up with the following error when I was in PM Transaction Entry Window. It bounces me out at the point of tabbing from the Currency Field with this error. A get/change operation on table 'FA_Company_SETP' cannot find the table. [Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver][SQL Server]Invalid object name 'TWO.dbo.FA49900' Does anyone have any idea what this means and how I can resolve this issue? It only happens in PM. -- Thanks, Teresa Your GP Client is expecting FA (Fixed As...