how do you type scientific notation in Word 2003?

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I'm trying to type problems that add, subtract,etc, into scientific notation. 
 Such as 1.2 x 10^3 + 2.3 x 10^6 so that the "3" and 6" are shown as an 
exponents. 
0
Reply Utf 12/31/2009 1:27:01 AM

Hi skcole11,

Simple: superscript the the "3" and 6".

-- 
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


"skcole11" <skcole11@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:9295C87B-B5D7-4A8D-A44C-F9C7058F08AF@microsoft.com...
> I'm trying to type problems that add, subtract,etc, into scientific notation. 
> Such as 1.2 x 10^3 + 2.3 x 10^6 so that the "3" and 6" are shown as an 
> exponents.
0
Reply macropod 12/31/2009 2:03:06 AM


Apply Superscript formatting to the exponents.  To do that, select the 
exponent and then hold down the Shift and the Ctrl keys and press the key 
with + above =

-- 
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

"skcole11" <skcole11@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message 
news:9295C87B-B5D7-4A8D-A44C-F9C7058F08AF@microsoft.com...
> I'm trying to type problems that add, subtract,etc, into scientific 
> notation.
> Such as 1.2 x 10^3 + 2.3 x 10^6 so that the "3" and 6" are shown as an
> exponents. 

0
Reply Doug 12/31/2009 2:07:58 AM

On Wed, 30 Dec 2009 17:27:01 -0800, skcole11
<skcole11@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I'm trying to type problems that add, subtract,etc, into scientific notation. 
> Such as 1.2 x 10^3 + 2.3 x 10^6 so that the "3" and 6" are shown as an 
>exponents. 

Select the exponent and format it as a superscript. The long way is to
right-click it, choose Font, and check the Superscript box in the
dialog. The shortcut is Ctrl+Shift+=.

--
Regards,
Jay Freedman
Microsoft Word MVP        FAQ: http://word.mvps.org
Email cannot be acknowledged; please post all follow-ups to the newsgroup so all may benefit.
0
Reply Jay 12/31/2009 2:33:41 AM

Hi,

The other replies included instructions for superscripting the exponent. 
There are, however, a few more things to consider.
1. Instead of the letter x, you can insert a real multiplication sign (×) 
from the Symbol dialog box, by typing d7 and then pressing Alt+x, or by 
creating an Autotext entry, an AutoCorrect sequence, or a shortcut key for it.
2. You might want to insert nonbreadking spaces before and after the 
multiplication sign to prevent the expression from being broken by a line 
break. This is easily done by pressing Shift+Cntrl+Spacebar instead of 
pressing just the spacebar.
3. For the minus sign in the exponent, you can insert a real minus sign (−) 
or an en dash (–) instead of an ordinary hyphen. The minus sign and en dash 
are practically identical in appearance. The advantage of using the en dash 
is that there is already a built-in shortcut key for it, Ctrl+-(num). The 
advantage of the real minus sign is that it prevents line breaking in the 
middle of the exponent. You can insert a real minus sign from the Symbol 
dialog box, by typing 2212 and then pressing Alt+x, or by creating an 
Autotext entry, an AutoCorrect sequence, or a shortcut key for it.  
4. I personally find it faster and easier to create superscripts by pressing 
Shift+Cntrl+=, typing the superscripted characters, and then pressing 
Cntrl+Spacebar to return to ordinary formatting, rather than by going back 
and selecting the characters to format after they are already typed. This 
technique requires less keystrokes does not involve reaching for the mouse. 

-- 
Hope this helps,
Pesach Shelnitz
My Web site: http://makeofficework.com 


"skcole11" wrote:

> I'm trying to type problems that add, subtract,etc, into scientific notation. 
>  Such as 1.2 x 10^3 + 2.3 x 10^6 so that the "3" and 6" are shown as an 
> exponents. 
1
Reply Utf 12/31/2009 8:20:01 AM

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