What does Microsoft Project Levels 1, 2, 3, 4, schedules mean?

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I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following 
questions:
What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?
3
Reply Utf 1/3/2010 7:30:01 AM

AFAIK, I never heard of such nomenclature in the context of the product 
as provided by Microsoft.  Are these words used on your project?  Where 
did you see these words written, or who uses them?


--rms

www.rmschneider.com




On 03/01/10 07:30, Alfred wrote:
> I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following
> questions:
> What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
> What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?
0
Reply Rob 1/3/2010 8:46:20 AM

I've seen this refer to tiers in the summary structure of the project schedule.

Tier 1 - Phase Names
Tier 2 - Subphases
....and so on and so forth.

If we have a master plan in construction, usually by tier 4-5, you're talking 
contractors or subcontractors, in which case you may or may not track their 
specific activities - instead, you may opt to roll up their own detailed 
plans to your Level 4 or 5 schedule items.

- Andrew Lavinsky
Blog: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm

> I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following
> questions:
> What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
> What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?



0
Reply Andrew 1/3/2010 5:57:11 PM

You should get clarification from the document author.  In my world over 
here, sometimes my customer refers to terms like this.  Whay they mean to say 
is "Work Breakdown Structure Level 1, 2, 3, 4" or WBS Level 1, 2, .... 

Here would be a level one schedule for a vacation. Notice the "level" has to 
do with the level of indenture of the outline, not the numerals 1, 2, 3, etc.

1.0 Plan Trip
2.0 Purchase Items
3. Execute Vacation
4. Tell Friends

Here is the Level 2:
1.0 Plan Trip
1.1 Decide where to go
1.2 Establish budget

2.0 Purchase Items
2.1 Purchase Plane tickets
2.2 Buy appropriate clothing
2.3 Buy camera

3.0   etc.

And here would be a sample of level 3 (portion)
1.0 Plan Trip
1.1 Decide where to go
1.1.1 Land
1.1.2 Sea
1.1.3 Air

To see the WBS for your schedule, insert a column for WBS. Another handy 
column is the Outline Level column which is essentially the number of decimal 
places (outline indentrure) in the outline.
This shows the increasing level of detail in your schedule.
-- 
If this post was helpful, please consider rating it.

Jim Aksel, MVP

Check out my blog for more information:
http://www.msprojectblog.com



"Alfred" wrote:

> I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following 
> questions:
> What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
> What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?
2
Reply Utf 1/3/2010 6:24:01 PM

Alfred -

There are two ways to answer this question - from the point of
Microsoft Project, and another from the point of WBS.

From the point of Microsoft Project, Level 1, Level 2, ..., represents
the level number present in the "Outline Level" field. You can try
creating summary tasks, and insert a column with the field name
"Outline Level". You would observe the project summary task (if you
have selected it in Tools | Options, View tab, Show Project Summary
task) has the outline level value has 0, and summary tasks in first
level will be with outline level value 1, and so on.

Now from the point of WBS development, which is a key input for
schedule development. Upper levels (lower id) represents the major
work areas or the major phases of the project. So, the summary tasks
with outline level value 1 or 2 should mostly be features of the
product/service, followed by the phases required to deliver the
product. The lower levels (higher ids) represent the work package
(that includes the tasks, estimated duration, estimated cost and
resources to create the deliverable).

Please let us know if this response is sufficient.

Regards
Sai
Website: http://saipower.wordpress.com/


On Jan 3, 12:30=A0pm, Alfred <Alf...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
> I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following
> questions:
> What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
> What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?

0
Reply sai 1/4/2010 8:41:10 AM

Alfred,
We occassionally help clients with this in our Microsoft Project and Project 
Server consulting practice.

'Levels' of Project schedules is not inherent to Project, but a way of 
identifying the level of detailed development of a schedule, which roughly 
correlates to the outline levels in a schedule (which may or may not map to a 
WBS). 

A 'Level 1' Project schedule is understood to be very high level, usually 
reflecting the summary tasks at the activity or deliverable level. At this 
point, the schedule is being used for top-down scheduling, and estimates are 
very rough, usually in the 50% + or - range, and is appropriate for the 
project initiation phase only. 

'Level 2' schedules have been decomposed to reflect the next level of 
detail, in which the schedule should be reflecting the next level of summary 
tasks or tasks. This is often the level of schedule that is submitted at the 
project charter stage, and estimates should be in the 20-30% + or - range.

'Level 3' schedules are the output of the Planning stage, reflecting 
thorough decomposition and detailed tasks and estimates, reflecting a 'bottom 
up' estimating methodology. This is often the level of schedule that is 
submitted at the end of the project planning stage. Estimates should be in 
the 5-10% + or - range. This is the schedule that should be executed.

We don't see 'Level 4' schedules often, but may include the detailed 
schedules of subprojects and contractors' work that is managed separately. 

These levels generally correlate with Project's outline levels: 1.0, 1.1, 
1.1.1, 1.1.1.1 

I hope this helps you.

- Kevin Williamson, MCTS, PMP




"Alfred" wrote:

> I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following 
> questions:
> What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
> What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
> What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?
3
Reply Utf 1/4/2010 4:45:01 PM

On 4 Jan, 17:45, Kevin Williamson <Kevin
William...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
> Alfred,
> We occassionally help clients with this in our Microsoft Project and Project
> Server consulting practice.
>
> 'Levels' of Project schedules is not inherent to Project, but a way of
> identifying the level of detailed development of a schedule, which roughly
> correlates to the outline levels in a schedule (which may or may not map to a
> WBS).
>
> A 'Level 1' Project schedule is understood to be very high level, usually
> reflecting the summary tasks at the activity or deliverable level. At this
> point, the schedule is being used for top-down scheduling, and estimates are
> very rough, usually in the 50% + or - range, and is appropriate for the
> project initiation phase only.
>
> 'Level 2' schedules have been decomposed to reflect the next level of
> detail, in which the schedule should be reflecting the next level of summary
> tasks or tasks. This is often the level of schedule that is submitted at the
> project charter stage, and estimates should be in the 20-30% + or - range.
>
> 'Level 3' schedules are the output of the Planning stage, reflecting
> thorough decomposition and detailed tasks and estimates, reflecting a 'bottom
> up' estimating methodology. This is often the level of schedule that is
> submitted at the end of the project planning stage. Estimates should be in
> the 5-10% + or - range. This is the schedule that should be executed.
>
> We don't see 'Level 4' schedules often, but may include the detailed
> schedules of subprojects and contractors' work that is managed separately.
>
> These levels generally correlate with Project's outline levels: 1.0, 1.1,
> 1.1.1, 1.1.1.1
>
> I hope this helps you.
>
> - Kevin Williamson, MCTS, PMP
>
>
>
> "Alfred" wrote:
> > I'm a MSP new user and I want a detailed explanation to the following
> > questions:
> > What is MS Project 'Level 1' schedule?
> > What is MS Project 'Level 2' schedule?
> > What is MS Project 'Level 3' schedule? and
> > What is MS Project 'Level 4' schedule?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Alfred,

This can mean anything. It depends who says it!

I have come a cross at least two more definitions than those described
above. You really need to clarify with whoever has made the statement
exactly what THEY mean. As far as I know there is nothing in MS
Project that refers to levels 1, 2, etc, only what has already been
described.

Having said that, I think the PMI scheduling practice (non toolset
specific) describes a five level schedule model. Try their website;
pmi.org

Hope this helps
0
Reply MrAlNather 1/5/2010 2:36:06 PM

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