Numbers left-aligned in a cell

I can enter a number as text by=20

(1)  formatting the cell as text=20
or=20
(2)  leaving the format as general but keying in a single quote with the =
number e.g. '76.

Either way, the number will be left-aligned with a green triangle i.e. =
if I invoke error checking.  If I untick error checking and don't notice =
the left alignment, the single quote should alert me that the number is =
in text format, right?=20

Do you see another difference between (1) and (2) especially in terms of =
application of the number (in text format)?  =20

Thanks.

Epinn

0
someone6932 (228)
10/12/2006 4:41:43 AM
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You aren't going to see the single quote except when you have the cell 
selected.  

Since there may be possibility of someone choosing (either intentionally or 
accidentally) left alignment for the cell, even its position/alignment isn't 
a sure bet as a clue.

If you're going 'public' with it, probably best to format the cell as Text 
so that the end user won't have to deal with remembering to enter number with 
' in front of it?

"Epinn" wrote:

> I can enter a number as text by 
> 
> (1)  formatting the cell as text 
> or 
> (2)  leaving the format as general but keying in a single quote with the number e.g. '76.
> 
> Either way, the number will be left-aligned with a green triangle i.e. if I invoke error checking.  If I untick error checking and don't notice the left alignment, the single quote should alert me that the number is in text format, right? 
> 
> Do you see another difference between (1) and (2) especially in terms of application of the number (in text format)?   
> 
> Thanks.
> 
> Epinn
> 
> 
0
Utf
10/12/2006 5:10:01 AM
Thank you.

>> ......possibility of someone choosing (either intentionally or=20
accidentally) left alignment for the cell......

Good point.

Epinn

"JLatham" <HelpFrom @ Jlathamsite.com.(removethis)> wrote in message =
news:E4A54C65-C08C-4F87-910B-265B722F887D@microsoft.com...
You aren't going to see the single quote except when you have the cell=20
selected. =20

Since there may be possibility of someone choosing (either intentionally =
or=20
accidentally) left alignment for the cell, even its position/alignment =
isn't=20
a sure bet as a clue.

If you're going 'public' with it, probably best to format the cell as =
Text=20
so that the end user won't have to deal with remembering to enter number =
with=20
' in front of it?

"Epinn" wrote:

> I can enter a number as text by=20
>=20
> (1)  formatting the cell as text=20
> or=20
> (2)  leaving the format as general but keying in a single quote with =
the number e.g. '76.
>=20
> Either way, the number will be left-aligned with a green triangle i.e. =
if I invoke error checking.  If I untick error checking and don't notice =
the left alignment, the single quote should alert me that the number is =
in text format, right?=20
>=20
> Do you see another difference between (1) and (2) especially in terms =
of application of the number (in text format)?  =20
>=20
> Thanks.
>=20
> Epinn
>=20
>


0
someone6932 (228)
10/12/2006 6:58:41 AM
You can use the alignment as a quick way to see if you have real
numbers or text values that look like numbers. For example, say you
have imported a column of dates: set the alignment for the column to
general and widen the column considerably. If the dates are "real"
dates then they will appear on the right of the column, but if they are
text values they will appear on the left, and the same applies for
other numbers which may really be text.

Hope this helps.

Pete

Epinn wrote:
> Thank you.
>
> >> ......possibility of someone choosing (either intentionally or
> accidentally) left alignment for the cell......
>
> Good point.
>
> Epinn
>
> "JLatham" <HelpFrom @ Jlathamsite.com.(removethis)> wrote in message news:E4A54C65-C08C-4F87-910B-265B722F887D@microsoft.com...
> You aren't going to see the single quote except when you have the cell
> selected.
>
> Since there may be possibility of someone choosing (either intentionally or
> accidentally) left alignment for the cell, even its position/alignment isn't
> a sure bet as a clue.
>
> If you're going 'public' with it, probably best to format the cell as Text
> so that the end user won't have to deal with remembering to enter number with
> ' in front of it?
>
> "Epinn" wrote:
>
> > I can enter a number as text by
> >
> > (1)  formatting the cell as text
> > or
> > (2)  leaving the format as general but keying in a single quote with the number e.g. '76.
> >
> > Either way, the number will be left-aligned with a green triangle i.e. if I invoke error checking.  If I untick error checking and don't notice the left alignment, the single quote should alert me that the number is in text format, right?
> >
> > Do you see another difference between (1) and (2) especially in terms of application of the number (in text format)?
> > 
> > Thanks.
> > 
> > Epinn
> > 
> >

0
pashurst (2576)
10/12/2006 1:36:26 PM
Thanks for your post and I always love little tricks and shortcuts. =20

The first time I read your post and caught the word "general," I was =
fixated on format>cell>number>general and I scratched my head.  Then, I =
reread and realized you might mean =
format>cell>alignment>horizontal>general.  Any true numbers that are =
left aligned will be easily revealed when I do format>cell>alignment =
because under horizontal it shows "left (indent)."  I'll remember this =
trick.  =20

It is solid proof to use ISTEXT or ISNUMBER, right?

Epinn

"Pete_UK" <pashurst@auditel.net> wrote in message =
news:1160660186.663020.181330@m7g2000cwm.googlegroups.com...
You can use the alignment as a quick way to see if you have real
numbers or text values that look like numbers. For example, say you
have imported a column of dates: set the alignment for the column to
general and widen the column considerably. If the dates are "real"
dates then they will appear on the right of the column, but if they are
text values they will appear on the left, and the same applies for
other numbers which may really be text.

Hope this helps.

Pete

Epinn wrote:
> Thank you.
>
> >> ......possibility of someone choosing (either intentionally or
> accidentally) left alignment for the cell......
>
> Good point.
>
> Epinn
>
> "JLatham" <HelpFrom @ Jlathamsite.com.(removethis)> wrote in message =
news:E4A54C65-C08C-4F87-910B-265B722F887D@microsoft.com...
> You aren't going to see the single quote except when you have the cell
> selected.
>
> Since there may be possibility of someone choosing (either =
intentionally or
> accidentally) left alignment for the cell, even its position/alignment =
isn't
> a sure bet as a clue.
>
> If you're going 'public' with it, probably best to format the cell as =
Text
> so that the end user won't have to deal with remembering to enter =
number with
> ' in front of it?
>
> "Epinn" wrote:
>
> > I can enter a number as text by
> >
> > (1)  formatting the cell as text
> > or
> > (2)  leaving the format as general but keying in a single quote with =
the number e.g. '76.
> >
> > Either way, the number will be left-aligned with a green triangle =
i.e. if I invoke error checking.  If I untick error checking and don't =
notice the left alignment, the single quote should alert me that the =
number is in text format, right?
> >
> > Do you see another difference between (1) and (2) especially in =
terms of application of the number (in text format)?
> >=20
> > Thanks.
> >=20
> > Epinn
> >=20
> >


0
someone6932 (228)
10/12/2006 6:44:49 PM
Reply:

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