How do I "CTRL [" (jump to a precedent cell) from a European keybo

How do I "CTRL [" (jump to a precedent cell) from a European keyboard?
0
Stucka (1)
2/17/2005 2:47:10 PM
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You mean European keyboards don't have the square brackets keys?

I didn't know that!

Anyway, you can accomplish *almost* the same thing by:

<Tools> <Options> <Edit> tab,
And *uncheck* "Edit Directly In Cell".

Then, all you have to do is double click in the cell containing the formula.

I did say *almost* because when you have the square brackets, where
<Ctrl> <[>
takes you to the precedents,
<Ctrl> <]>
returns you to the original.

I haven't been able to find out how to do the "return" without using the
brackets.
-- 

HTH,

RD
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"Tim Stucka" <Tim Stucka@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:241434C1-8A27-4A48-809A-E7C900B418E5@microsoft.com...
How do I "CTRL [" (jump to a precedent cell) from a European keyboard?


0
ragdyer1 (4060)
2/17/2005 3:55:41 PM
Reply:

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